HARVARD-YENCHING INSTITUTE MONOGRAPH SERIES
Cover: The Sage Learning of Liu Zhi: Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms, from Harvard University PressCover: The Sage Learning of Liu Zhi in HARDCOVER

Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series 65

The Sage Learning of Liu Zhi

Islamic Thought in Confucian Terms

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$59.95 • £47.95 • €54.00

ISBN 9780674033252

Publication Date: 03/31/2009

Text

678 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

140 line illustrations

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard-Yenching Institute Monograph Series

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Liu Zhi (ca. 1670–1724) was one of the most important scholars of Islam in traditional China. His Tianfang xingli (Nature and Principle in Islam), the Chinese-language text translated here, focuses on the roots or principles of Islam. It was heavily influenced by several classic texts in the Sufi tradition. Liu’s approach, however, is distinguished from that of other Muslim scholars in that he addressed the basic articles of Islamic thought with Neo-Confucian terminology and categories. Besides its innate metaphysical and philosophical value, the text is invaluable for understanding how the masters of Chinese Islam straddled religious and civilizational frontiers and created harmony between two different intellectual worlds.

The introductory chapters explore both the Chinese and the Islamic intellectual traditions behind Liu’s work and locate the arguments of Tianfang xingli within those systems of thought. The copious annotations to the translation explain Liu’s text and draw attention to parallels in Chinese-, Arabic-, and Persian-language works as well as differences.

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