Cover: How Judges Think, from Harvard University PressCover: How Judges Think in PAPERBACK

How Judges Think

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.00 • £19.95 • €21.50

ISBN 9780674048065

Publication Date: 05/01/2010

Short

400 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 line illustration, 8 tables

World

Posner’s latest book, How Judges Think, is important, if only because it’s Posner looking at his own profession from the inside. Two of the chapters, ‘Judges Are Not Law Professors’ and ‘Is Pragmatic Adjudication Inescapable?,’ are worth the price of admission by themselves. The book can be read as one long screed against the jurisprudence of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, and stands as a refutation to those who believe the category of conservative can lazily be applied to a mind as independent as Posner’s.—Barry Gewen, The New York Times

A prolific and brilliant writer, Posner’s How Judges Think is perhaps his most illuminating work for its profound, and sometimes polemical, insights into the judicial process… Judge Posner’s examination of the issues is thorough, scholarly and riveting. He has written an important book—a must read not just for lawyers, but also for anyone who wants to understand how the inscrutable, and sometimes oracular, process of judging really works.—James D. Zirin, Forbes

Posner is unique in the world of American jurisprudence, a highly regarded U.S. appellate judge and a prolific and controversial writer on legal philosophy. Opinionated, sarcastic and argumentative as ever, Posner is happy to weigh in not only on how judges think, but how he thinks they should think. When sticking to explaining the nine intellectual approaches to judging that he identifies, and to the gap between legal academics and judges, and his well-formulated pragmatic approach to judging, Posner is insightful, accessible, often funny and a model of clarity.Publishers Weekly

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene