Cover: Mahogany: The Costs of Luxury in Early America, from Harvard University PressCover: Mahogany in HARDCOVER

Mahogany

The Costs of Luxury in Early America

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674048713

Publication Date: 09/17/2012

Short

432 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

11 color illustrations, 19 halftones, 2 maps

World

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Introduction
  • 1. A New Species of Elegance
  • 2. The Gold Standard of Jamaican Mahogany
  • 3. Supplying the Empire with Mahogany
  • 4. The Bitters and the Sweets of Trade
  • 5. Slavery in the Rain Forest
  • 6. Redefining Mahogany in the Early Republic
  • 7. Mastering Nature and the Challenge of Mahogany
  • 8. Democratizing Mahogany and the Advent of Steam
  • 9. An Old Species of Elegance
  • Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • Index
  • * Illustrations:
    • Map 1. Native Ranges of Commercially Harvested Mahogany Species
    • Map 2. Some Key Destinations of Mahogany in North America and Northern Europe
    • Figure 1.1 Tilt-top Tea Table, unattributed, Philadelphia, PA, circa 1765–1775
    • Figure 1.2 Blockfront Bureau Table, attributed to John Townsend, Newport, RI, 1785–95
    • Figure 1.3. Trade Card, Benjamin Randolph, Philadelphia, PA, circa 1769
    • Figure 1.4a–c. Desk and Bookcase, with details, attributed to John Welch, Boston, MA, circa 1750
    • Figure 1.5. Paul Revere, John Singleton Copley, Boston, MA, 1768
    • Figure 2.1. “Nova Designatio Insulae Jamaicae,” Matthäus Seutter, circa 1744
    • Figure 2.2 George Robertson, “A View of the Island of Jamaica,” London, 1778
    • Figure 3.1. Detail of the 1786 Treaty Map of the Bay of Honduras
    • Figure 5.1. “Cutting & Trucking Mahogany in Honduras,” in Chaloner & Fleming, The Mahogany Tree, 1850
    • Figure 5.2. “Felling Mahogany in Honduras,” in Chaloner & Fleming, The Mahogany Tree, 1850
    • Figure 7.1. Frontispiece, Nicolai Jacquin, Selectarum Stirpium Americanarum Historia, Vienna, 1763
    • Figure 8.1. “Clearing Mahogany Down the Rapids in Cuba,” in Chaloner & Fleming, The Mahogany Tree, 1850
    • Figure 8.2. “Cart of the Country Loaded with Mahogany in Cuba,” in Chaloner & Fleming, The Mahogany Tree, 1850
    • Figure 8.3. “Steam Sawmill on the New Hope Sugar Estate,” Cuba, George Howe, circa 1832
    • Figure 8.4. “Catalogue of 305 Logs, Cuba Mahogany … to be Sold at Auction,” New York, NY, 1847
    • Figure 8.5. Steam-powered Veneering Saw and Veneer Polishing Machines, 1876
    • Figure 8.6. “Keyser & Foxe’s Mahogany Steam Saw Mill & Turning Shop,” Philadelphia, PA, circa 1854
    • Figure 8.7. Price & Harper’s Steam Saw Mill … and Lumber Yard, Philadelphia, PA, 1855
    • Figure 8.8. “The Cabinet-maker, and The Upholsterer,” 1836
    • Figure 8.9. Trade Card, George J. Henkels, Cabinetmaker, Philadelphia, PA, circa 1850
    • Figure 8.10. “George Meckes Northern Cabinet Ware-Rooms,” Philadelphia, PA, circa 1847

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