THE JOHN HARVARD LIBRARY
Cover: The Tribunal: Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid, from Harvard University PressCover: The Tribunal in HARDCOVER

The Tribunal

Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$46.50 • £37.95 • €42.00

ISBN 9780674048850

Publication Date: 10/31/2012

Short

640 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 halftone, 2 line illustrations

Belknap Press

The John Harvard Library

World

  • Introduction
  • Part I: In His Own Words
    • “Sambo’s Mistakes,” 1848
    • “League of Gileadites,” January 15, 1851
    • “Dear Wife and Children, Everyone,” June 1856
    • “Old Brown’s Farewell,” April 1857
    • “To Mr. Henry L. Stearns,” July 15, 1857
    • “Provisional Constitution and Ordinances for the People of the United States,” May 8, 1858
    • “A Declaration of Liberty by the Representatives of the Slave Population of the United States of America,” 1859
    • “Interview with Senator Mason and Others,” October 18, 1859
    • “Last Address to the Virginia Court,” November 2, 1859
    • “Prison Letters,” October–December, 1859
  • Part II: Northern Responses
    • Horace Greeley, “Tribune Editorial,” October 19, 1859
    • Boston Courier, “A Lesson for the People,” October 20, 1859
    • Illinois State Register, “The ‘Irrepressible Conflict,’” October 20, 1859
    • Anonymous, “To the Clerk of Court, Charlestown,” October 23, 1859, and “To Friend Wise,” December 2, 1859
    • The Patriot, “The Harper’s Ferry Affair,” October 26, 1859
    • Lydia Maria Child, “Dear Captain Brown, ” October 26, 1859, and “The Hero’s Heart,” January 26, 1860
    • E.B., “To John Brown,” October 27, 1859
    • Joshua R. Giddings, “The Harper’s Ferry Insurrection,” October 28, 1859
    • Friends’ Review, “The Riot at Harper’s Ferry,” October 29, 1859
    • Salmon P. Chase, “To Joseph H. Barrett,” October 29, 1859
    • New York Evening Post, “A New Version of an Old Song,” October 29, 1859
    • Henry Ward Beecher, “The Nation’s Duty to Slavery,” October 30, 1859
    • Henry David Thoreau, “A Plea for Captain John Brown,” October 30, 1859, and “The Last Days of John Brown,” July 4, 1860
    • Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Courage,” November 8, 1859, and “Remarks at a Meeting for the Relief of the Family of John Brown,” November 18, 1859
    • Frederick Douglass, “Capt. John Brown Not Insane,” November 1859
    • Edmund Clarence Stedman, “How Old Brown Took Harper’s Ferry,” November 12, 1859
    • William Dean Howells, “Old Brown,” November 1859
    • John Andrew, “Speech at Tremont Temple,” November 18, 1859
    • Charles Langston, “Letter to the Editor of the Cleveland Plain Dealer,” November 18, 1859, and “Speech in Cleveland,” December 2, 1859
    • Theodore Parker, “To Francis Jackson,” November 24, 1859
    • Henry Clarke Wright, The Natick Resolution, December 1859
    • Albany Evening Journal, “The Execution of John Brown,” December 1, 1859
    • “Pittsburgh, Detroit, and Cleveland Resolutions,” November 29 and December 2, 1859
    • Henry Highland Garnet, “Martyr’s Day,” December 2, 1859
    • J. Sella Martin and William Lloyd Garrison, “Speeches at Tremont Temple,” December 2, 1859
    • Fales Henry Newhall, “The Conflict in America,” December 4, 1859
    • Anne Lynch Botta, “To Henry Whitney Bellows,” December 6, 1859
    • Wendell Phillips, “Eulogy for John Brown,” December 8, 1859
    • Edward Everett and Caleb Cushing, “Speeches at Faneuil Hall,” December 8, 1859
    • Charles Eliot Norton, “To Mrs. Edward Twisleton,” December 13, 1859
    • Charles Sumner, “To the Duchess of Argyll,” December 20, 1859
    • John Greenleaf Whittier, “Brown of Ossawatomie,” December 22, 1859
    • Thomas Hamilton, “The Nat Turner Insurrection,” December 1859
    • William A. Phillips, “The Age and the Man,” January 20, 1860
    • Louisa May Alcott, “With a Rose That Bloomed on the Day of John Brown’s Martyrdom,” January 20, 1860
    • Stephen Douglas, “Invasion of States,” January 23, 1860
    • Richard Realf, “John Brown’s Raid,” January 30, 1860
    • Abraham Lincoln, “Address at the Cooper Institute,” February 27, 1860
    • William H. Seward, “The State of the Country,” February 29, 1860, and “The National Idea,” October 3, 1860
    • John S. Rock, “Ninetieth Anniversary of the Boston Massacre,” March 5, 1860
    • William Henry Furness, “Put Up Thy Sword,” March 11, 1860
    • Carl Schurz, “The Doom of Slavery,” August 1, 1860
    • Pennsylvania Statesman, “Old Brown’s Argument,” October 20, 1860
    • Lucretia Mott, “Remarks to the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society,” October 25, 1860
    • Osborne P. Anderson, A Voice from Harper’s Ferry, early 1861
  • Part III: Southern Responses
    • Henry Wise, “Comments in Richmond, Virginia,” October 21, 1859
    • Republican Banner and Nashville Whig, “The Harper’s Ferry Riot,” October 24, 1859
    • Robert Barnwell Rhett, “The Insurrection,” October 31, 1859
    • Richmond Daily Enquirer, “A Suggestion for Governor Wise,” November 2, 1859
    • Southern Watchman, “The Harper’s Ferry Insurrection,” November 3, 1859
    • D.H. Strother, “The Late Invasion at Harper’s Ferry,” November 5, 1859, and “The Trial of the Conspirators,” November 12, 1859
    • Sarah Frances Williams, “To My Dear Parents,” November 7 and 11, 1859
    • Margaretta Mason, “To Lydia Maria Child,” November 11, 1859
    • Arkansas Gazette, “The Harper’s Ferry Insurrection,” November 12, 1859
    • Richmond Whig, “Editorial,” November 18, 1859
    • Natchez Courier, “Forewarned, Forearmed,” November 18, 1859
    • Mahala Doyle, “To John Brown,” November 20, 1859
    • Edmund Ruffin, “Resolutions of the Central Southern Rights Association,” November 25, 1859, and Anticipations of the Future, June 1860
    • Susan Bradford Eppes, “Diary,” October–December 1859
    • Amanda Virginia Edmonds, “Diary,” November and December 1859
    • Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, “Dear Friend,” November 25, 1859, and “The Triumph of Freedom—A Dream,” January 1860
    • Thomas J. Jackson, “To Mary Anna Jackson,” December 2, 1859
    • John Preston, “To Margaret Junkin Preston,” December 2, 1859
    • Raleigh Register, “The Execution of John Brown,” December 3, 1859
    • Moncure Conway, “Sermon,” December 4, 1859
    • Reuben Davis, “The Duty of Parties,” December 8, 1859
    • Anonymous, “A Woman’s View of a Woman’s Duty in Connection with John Brown’s Crimes,” December 11, 1859
    • Andrew Johnson, “Remarks to the Senate,” December 12, 1859
    • James A. Seddon, “To R.M.T. Hunter,” December 26, 1859
    • Anonymous, “Old John Brown, a Song for Every Southern Man,” ca. December 1859
    • Mann Satterwhite Valentine, “The Mock Auction,” 1860
    • George Fitzhugh, “Disunion within the Union,” January 1860
    • C.G. Memminger, “The South Carolina Mission to Virginia,” January 19, 1860
    • Alexander Boteler, “Speech on the Organization of the House,” January 25, 1860
    • John Tyler, Jr., “The Secession of the South,” April 1860
    • National Democratic Executive Committee, The Great Issue to Be Decided in November Next, September 1860
    • Howell Cobb, “Letter to the People of Georgia,” December 6, 1860
    • William Gilmore Simms, “To a Northern Friend,” December 12, 1860
    • John Wilkes Booth, “Philadelphia Speech,” December 1860
    • Richard K. Call, “To John S. Littell,” February 12, 1861
    • James Williams, “To Henry Peter Brougham, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux,” February 1861
  • Part IV: International Responses
    • The Times, “Editorial,” November 2, 1859
    • Joseph Barker, “Slavery and Civil War,” November 1859
    • L’Univers, “Editorial,” November 24, 1859
    • Cyprian Kamil Norwid, “To Citizen John Brown” and “John Brown,” November 1859
    • Victor Hugo, “A Word on John Brown,” December 2, 1859; “To M. Heurtelou,” March 31, 1860; and “To the Memory of John Brown,” October 21, 1874
    • Ottilie Assing, “John Brown’s Execution and Its Consequences,” December 1859
    • Harvey C. Jackson, “An Address to the Colored People of Canada,” December 7, 1859
    • Glasgow Herald, “The Outbreak at Harper’s Ferry,” December 19, 1859
    • Aberdeen Journal, “A Martyr or a Criminal?” December 21, 1859
    • Manchester Examiner and Times, “The Execution of John Brown,” December 24, 1859
    • Harriet Martineau, “John Brown; South’s Political Posturing,” December 24, 1859, and “The Puritan Militant,” January 28, 1860
    • Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper, “Captain John Brown,” December 25, 1859
    • Caledonian Mercury and Daily Express, “A New Year’s Reverie,” January 2, 1860
    • Anti-Slavery Reporter, “The Harper’s Ferry Tragedy,” January 2, 1860
    • Argus, “A Revolt in America,” January 10, 1860
    • Karl Marx, “To Friedrich Engels,” January 11, 1860
    • Feuille du Commerce, “John Brown,” January 21, 1860
    • Joseph Déjacque, “To Pierre Vésinier,” February 20, 1861
    • William Howard Russell, “Diary,” April 20 and August 17, 1861
    • J.M. Ludlow, “A Year of the Slavery Question in the United States (1859–60),” December 1862
    • Louis Ratisbonne, “John Brown,” February 1863
    • Giuseppe Garibaldi, “To President Lincoln,” August 6, 1863
    • W.T. Malleson and Washington Wilks, “Speeches to the Emancipation Society,” December 2, 1863
    • John Stuart Mill, Autobiography, 1873
    • Hermann von Holst, “John Brown,” 1878
  • Part V: Civil War and U.S. Postwar Responses
    • Various Authors, “John Brown’s Body,” May 1861
    • Elizabeth Van Lew, “Occasional Diary,” 1861
    • Mary Boykin Chesnut, “A Diary from Dixie,” November 28, 1861
    • Wilder Dwight, “Letters,” July 30, 1861, and March 4 and 8, 1862
    • George Michael Neese, “Diary,” January 3 and 26, 1862
    • Nathaniel Hawthorne, “Chiefly about War Matters. By a Peaceable Man,” July 1862
    • John Sherman, “To William Tecumseh Sherman,” September 23, 1862
    • Charlotte Forten, “Diary” and “Letter,” November 1862
    • Moncure Conway, The Golden Hour, 1862
    • Adalbert Volck, “Worship of the North” and “Writing the Emancipation Proclamation,” 1863
    • John H. Surratt, “Diary,” January 16 and 20, 1863
    • Anonymous, “John Brown’s Entrance into Hell,” March 1863
    • J. Sella Martin, “Speech to the Emancipation Society,” December 2, 1863
    • William Henry Hall, “Oration on the Occasion of the Emancipation Celebration,” January 1, 1864
    • John Wilkes Booth, “Remarks on Lincoln and Brown,” November 1864
    • Walt Whitman, “Year of Meteors (1859–60),” 1865
    • Joseph G. Rosengarten, “John Brown’s Raid: How I Got into It and How I Got Out of It,” June 1865
    • C. Chauncey Burr, “History of Old John Brown,” July 1865
    • Henry Ingersoll Bowditch, “Dear Mrs. H—,” July 27, 1865
    • Charles Sumner, “The National Security and the National Faith,” September 14, 1865
    • James Buchanan, Mr. Buchanan’s Administration on the Eve of the Rebellion, 1866
    • Herman Melville, “The Portent (1859),” 1866
    • Gerrit Smith, “John Brown,” August 15, 1867
    • John Milton Hay, “Diary,” September 10, 1867
    • Richard Henry Dana, Jr., “How We Met John Brown,” July 1871
    • Henry S. Olcott, “How We Hung John Brown,” 1875
    • Colored Citizen, “Wanted, a Few Black John Browns,” January 4, 1879
    • Eli Thayer, “To G. W. Brown,” January 13, 1880
    • Frederick Douglass, “John Brown,” May 30, 1881
    • George Washington Williams, “John Brown—Hero and Martyr,” 1883
    • David N. Utter, “John Brown of Osawatomie,” November 1883
    • Mark Twain, “English as She is Taught,” April 1887
    • Frank Preston Stearns, “Unfriendly Criticism of John Brown,” 1888
    • T. Thomas Fortune, “John Brown and Nat. Turner,” January 12 and 29, 1889
  • Notes
  • Further Reading
  • Index

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