Cover: What the Best Law Teachers Do, from Harvard University PressCover: What the Best Law Teachers Do in HARDCOVER

What the Best Law Teachers Do

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.95 • £23.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674049147

Publication Date: 08/20/2013

Trade

368 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

2 graphs, 1 table

World

The authors present several interesting ideas relevant to teaching and learning law, ideas that should flourish at a time when law schools are seeking ways to reinvent themselves. The intended reach of this book, primarily teachers of law, is narrow, but teachers of all subjects stand to benefit.Publishers Weekly

This book fills an enormous vacuum in law teaching literature. Based on painstaking, methodical, individual attention to 26 carefully-selected law professors from around the country, it presents cogent, inspiring, and concrete approaches to teaching and student–teacher relationships in the voices of the teachers and their students themselves.—Jean Koh Peters, Yale University

Reading this book is like sitting down and having extensive conversations with excellent teaching mentors. It is a wonderful addition to the professional mentorship that is so important yet often so lacking in faculty development.—Alison Grey Anderson, University of California, Los Angeles

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene