Cover: Asian Power and Politics: The Cultural Dimensions of Authority, from Harvard University PressCover: Asian Power and Politics in PAPERBACK

Asian Power and Politics

The Cultural Dimensions of Authority

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$43.50 • £34.95 • €39.00

ISBN 9780674049796

Publication Date: 03/15/1988

Short

430 pages

6 x 9 inches

Belknap Press

World

[A] rich and stimulating analysis which will be the subject of much scholarly debate.Foreign Affairs

An extremely lucid, informative, and valuable work that meets a long-standing need for a readable and comprehensive view of the methods and cultural foundations of exercising power and authority in Asia.Choice

Pye’s thesis is that as social psychology cannot be properly understood unless it is embodied in a context of individual psychology, so the phenomenon of power cannot be understood without reference to the cultural context within which it exists. Pye contends that those political scientists who study the nature of power have erred in treating it as a universal concept… Central to Pye’s thesis is his contrasting of the Western concept of individual autonomy with the Eastern concept of dependency on an idealized, benevolent, authoritarian leadership. Closely reasoned and brilliantly argued, this is a superb contribution to the international political debate.Kirkus Reviews

Absorbing reading. It is written with a flair and dash that carries one along. Reading it is like following the figures in a richly textured tapestry. Pye’s mastery of this variety of complex cultures is impressive. It rings with authenticity.—Gabriel A. Almond, Stanford University

A broadly gauged analysis of contemporary Asian politics. This study is a fascinating mix of in-depth data and basic theses, both intra-culture and cross-cultural in nature. It will provide the basis for stimulating discussion and further research.—Robert A. Scalapino, Robson Research Professor of Government, University of California, Berkeley

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