HARVARD HISTORICAL STUDIES
Cover: Youth in the Fatherless Land: War Pedagogy, Nationalism, and Authority in Germany, 1914–1918, from Harvard University PressCover: Youth in the Fatherless Land in HARDCOVER

Harvard Historical Studies 169

Youth in the Fatherless Land

War Pedagogy, Nationalism, and Authority in Germany, 1914–1918

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$61.50 • £49.95 • €55.50

ISBN 9780674049833

Publication Date: 04/01/2010

Short

344 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

10 halftones, 3 charts, 2 tables

Harvard Historical Studies

World

This sophisticated and deeply researched work is the first major study of the ‘war youth generation’ in Germany. Especially original is Donson’s treatment of war pedagogy that institutionalized the populist nationalism of August 1914. By exploring both the common experiences of youth as well as the divergences conditioned by class and gender, he accounts for the polarization within the Socialist and middle class youth movements and ultimately explains why the war generation proved so susceptible to the appeals of the Communists and Nazis. Donson has produced a thought-provoking analysis of some of the wrenching discontinuities in twentieth-century Germany’s agonized history.—Derek S. Linton, Hobart and William Smith Colleges

Donson’s well-researched and nuanced study of German youth during World War I offers fresh perspectives on the history of class, gender, political mobilization, and the legacy of the war. Youth in the Fatherless Land tells a fascinating story of how the war encouraged authoritarianism, reform, and independence, all at the same time.—Annemarie Sammartino, Oberlin College

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