THE JOHN HARVARD LIBRARY
Cover: Prison Blossoms: Anarchist Voices from the American Past, from Harvard University PressCover: Prison Blossoms in HARDCOVER

Prison Blossoms

Anarchist Voices from the American Past

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674050563

Publication Date: 05/05/2011

Short

320 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

Belknap Press

The John Harvard Library

World

These writings allow readers to examine the anarchists, who come off as well-read and articulate authors, quite different from the common view of anarchists at the time and somewhat since… Of interest to those studying the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era, political thought, and prisons, both historically and currently. A worthwhile purchase.—S.A. Merriman, Choice

At long last, these passionate and perceptive anarchists can be heard! Magnificently edited and masterfully translated, Prison Blossoms should command the attention of anyone interested in the delivery, denial or deferral of justice in the United States.—Glenn C. Altschuler, Cornell University

Prison Blossoms are a distant cousin of Gramsci’s Prison Notebooks. This book reminds us how much we learn about the self-absorbed center of society from those who are caged in at its margin. A gem of a book.—Mary Fainsod Katzenstein, author of Faithful and Fearless

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene