DUMBARTON OAKS MEDIEVAL LIBRARY
Cover: The <i>Beowulf</i> Manuscript: Complete Texts and <i>The Fight at Finnsburg</i>, from Harvard University PressCover: The <i>Beowulf</i> Manuscript in HARDCOVER

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 3
Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection `

The Beowulf Manuscript

Complete Texts and The Fight at Finnsburg

Edited and translated by R. D. Fulk

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674052956

Publication Date: 11/22/2010

Short

Understandably, interest in the manuscript has centered on Beowulf, and it is still called the Beowulf manuscript here, though—unprecedentedly—this new book contains both text and translations of all the Nowell manuscript’s items: the three prose works that precede BeowulfThe Passion of St. Christopher, The Wonders of the East, and The Letters of Alexander the Great to Aristotle—as well as Judith. It is an inspired project. R. D. Fulk is one of the world’s leading Beowulfians… Fulk has produced an elegant, slightly archaized prose version of the poem (‘He lived to see remedy for that’) that keeps to the same register for all the items in the manuscript. His textual notes are predictably authoritative, and he conveys a remarkable amount of information within a small compass in his notes to the translations. …This delightful book is a particularly graceful member of the beautifully produced Dumbarton Oaks series.—Bernard O’Donoghue, The Times Literary Supplement

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