Cover: Migrant Teachers: How American Schools Import Labor, from Harvard University PressCover: Migrant Teachers in HARDCOVER

Migrant Teachers

How American Schools Import Labor

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$41.00 • £32.95 • €37.00

ISBN 9780674055360

Publication Date: 01/06/2014

Text

202 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

3 line illustrations, 5 graphs, 3 tables

World

Migrant Teachers highlights a largely invisible phenomenon in American schools—the hiring of teachers from other countries, and the concentration of those teachers in high poverty schools and districts. Lora Bartlett places teacher labor markets in global context, opening a new line of research on teachers’ work and careers, and compelling us to consider what it means to be a teacher at this time and place.—Judith Warren Little, University of California, Berkeley

This important study persuasively describes the motivations for teacher migration and the insecurity of their tenure in America, and reveals, for the first time, how dependent some urban schools have become on immigrant teachers.—Rhacel Salazar Parreñas, author of Children of Global Migration: Transnational Families and Gendered Woes

A powerful exploration of a significant and neglected issue in American education. Migrant Teachers is a very compelling and original book.—John Skrentny, author of After Civil Rights: Racial Realism in the New American Workplace

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene