THE EDWIN O. REISCHAUER LECTURES
Cover: Cultivating Global Citizens: Population in the Rise of China, from Harvard University PressCover: Cultivating Global Citizens in HARDCOVER

The Edwin O. Reischauer Lectures 2008

Cultivating Global Citizens

Population in the Rise of China

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$36.00 • £28.95 • €32.50

ISBN 9780674055711

Publication Date: 10/15/2010

Short

156 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

1 halftone, 5 line illustrations, 6 tables

The Edwin O. Reischauer Lectures

World

In this wide-ranging and impressive work, Greenhalgh examines the evolution of China’s population policy in the post-Mao era. She notes that during the past thirty years the role of the state in managing China’s population and the bodies of its citizens has expanded enormously, involving efforts to promote women’s health, foster higher population ‘quality,’ and even combat infertility. If we want to understand the challenges that China’s rise presents to the rest of the world, we need to appreciate the centrality of all aspects of population management in the strategic thinking of Chinese elites. Cultivating Global Citizens provides a vital guide to this controversial terrain.—Martin K. Whyte, editor of One Country, Two Societies: Rural–Urban Inequality in Contemporary China

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