THE I TATTI RENAISSANCE LIBRARY
Cover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1: Book I, from Harvard University PressCover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1 in HARDCOVER

The I Tatti Renaissance Library 49

Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1

Book I

Lorenzo Valla

Edited and translated by Brian P. Copenhaver

Lodi Nauta

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.95 • £19.95 • €21.00

ISBN 9780674055766

Publication Date: 08/13/2012

Short

Copenhaver and Nauta have found precisely Valla’s inimitable voice. Throughout their Dialectical Disputations, the reader can hear the utterly infectious immediacy with which Valla read the works of the ancient world. The glowing gift of the Renaissance was its refusal to think of those works as dead—buoyed by the ongoing re-discovery of manuscripts and armed with a revived knowledge of Greek and Latin, scholars and bookworms like Valla embarked on entirely new ways of reading, and our translators perfectly capture how personal an endeavor it was… Readers seeking lively, challenging company can’t do much better than Valla, and now they have his greatest work in an English language version he would have loved.—Steve Donoghue, Open Letters Monthly

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