THE I TATTI RENAISSANCE LIBRARY
Cover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1: Book I, from Harvard University PressCover: Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1 in HARDCOVER

The I Tatti Renaissance Library 49

Dialectical Disputations, Volume 1

Book I

Lorenzo Valla

Edited and translated by Brian P. Copenhaver

Lodi Nauta

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.95 • £19.95 • €21.00

ISBN 9780674055766

Publication Date: 08/13/2012

Short

  • Introduction
  • Dialectical Disputations
    • Book I
      • Proem
      • 1. Predicaments and transcendentals, what and how many?
      • 2. The meaning of the six called ‘transcendental,’ and proof that ‘thing’ is chief among them, while the rest are not transcendental
      • 3. Except in a few special cases, the term ‘concrete’ means nothing
      • 4. Nouns in -ness or -ity come from adjectives, not substantives, and not from all adjectives.
      • 5. There is no difference between ‘essence’ and ‘to be,’ and likewise with other terms like ‘will’ and ‘to will.’
      • 6. On distinguishing the use of these words, ‘essence’ and ‘substance,’ so that our speech is not tangled in confusions
      • 7. The classification of substance: Against Porphyry and others
      • 8. On Spirit and on God and angels
      • 9. On the soul
      • 10. On virtues
      • 11. On body
      • 12. On matter and form and the composite
      • 13. On accident and that nine predicaments reduce to two, quality and action
      • 14. On qualities cognized by the senses
      • 15. On qualities grasped by perceptions
      • 16. On action, motion and the verb ‘to be’
      • 17. That the rest of the predicaments reduce either to substance or to quality or to action
      • 18. Whether ‘more’ and ‘less’ fall under quality and not under substance
      • 19. ‘Middle’ comes between what?
      • 20. On definition, description, etymology and property
  • Note on the Text
  • Notes to the Text
  • Abbreviations
  • Notes to the Translation
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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