HELLENIC STUDIES SERIES
Cover: The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft: Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective, from Harvard University PressCover: The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft in PAPERBACK

Hellenic Studies Series 47

The Epic Rhapsode and His Craft

Homeric Performance in a Diachronic Perspective

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PAPERBACK

$27.50 • £22.95 • €25.00

ISBN 9780674055896

Publication Date: 01/12/2015

Text

  • Key to the Books of the Iliad and the Odyssey
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction
  • Part I. The ‘Homeric Question’
    • 1. Dictation Theories and Pre-Hellenic Literacy
      • 1.1. Statement of the Problem
      • 1.2 Albert Lord’s Dictation Theory
      • 1.3 Richard Janko’s Dictation Theory
      • 1.4 Written Epics from the Near Past
      • 1.5 Written Phoenician Literature
    • 2. Dictation Theories and Archaic Art
      • 2.1 M. L. West’s Dictation Theory
      • 2.2 Artistic Iconography
        • 2.2.1 Alleged illustrations of the Iliad
        • 2.2.2 Alleged illustrations of the Odyssey
        • 2.2.3 A fluid sixth-century Homer
      • 2.3 Homer, a Writing Poet?
    • 3. The Technology of Writing
    • 4. The Euboian Connection
      • 4.1 The Cultural Argument
      • 4.2 The Linguistic Argument
        • 4.2.1 The third CL
        • 4.2.2 Dating the second CL
        • 4.2.3 Dipylon oinokhoē
        • 4.2.4 Syllabification of -nw- clusters
    • 5. Archaic Inscriptions before 650 BC
      • 5.1 The Inscription from Cumae
        • 5.1.1 hisa
        • 5.1.2 Missing iotas?
        • 5.1.3 tinnuna
        • 5.1.4 The alleged meaning
      • 5.2 Nestor’s Cup (CEG no. 454)
        • 5.2.1 δ’ ἅν versus δέ κε
        • 5.2.2 κεῖνος versus ἐκεῖνος
        • 5.2.3 καλλιστεφανο Αφροδιτες
        • 5.2.4 An eighth-century bookhand?
    • 6. Early Homeric Scholarship and Editions
      • 6.1 Ajax and Salamis
      • 6.2 Theagenes of Rhegion
      • 6.3 The Name ‘Homer’
  • Part II. Rhapsodic Performance in Pre-Classical Greece
    • 7. Homer the Rhapsode
      • 7.1 Notional Fixity in Oral Poetry
      • 7.2 Invoking the Muses
        • 7.2.1 Efficacious speech
        • 7.2.2 Quoted speech
        • 7.2.3 The singer, instrument of the Muse
    • 8. Hesiod the Rhapsode
      • 8.1 Mantic Poetry
        • 8.1.1 Hesiod’s Dichterweihe
        • 8.1.2 Revealing the song
        • 8.1.3 The divine will
      • 8.2 Of Truth and Lies
      • 8.3 Μἀντις and Προφήτης
        • 8.3.1 Ecstasy
        • 8.3.2 The Delphic Oracle
        • 8.3.3 Oracular verse
      • 8.4 Plato and Inspired Poetry
  • Part III. Rhapsodic Performance in High-Classical Athens
    • 9. The Rhapsode in Classical Athens
      • 9.1 Of Transcripts and Scripts
      • 9.2 The Rhapsode as Ὑποκριτής
      • 9.3 The Rhapsode as Έπαινἐτης
      • 9.4 The Rhapsode and Ὑπόκρισις
      • 9.5 Alkidamas’ On the Sophists
      • 9.6 Ῥαψῳδέω in Isokrates and Plato
    • 10. The Rhapsode in Performance
      • 10.1 Understanding the Rhapsode
        • 10.1.1 Etymology
        • 10.1.2 Stitching the song: creative work?
      • 10.2 Understanding Rhapsodic Performance
        • 10.2.1 Non-melodic recitation?
        • 10.2.2 Ῥἀπτω and Homeric artistry
        • 10.2.3 Rhapsodic sequencing and relay poetics
          • 10.2.3.1 Kallimakhos and the rhapsodes
          • 10.2.3.2 δἐγμενος/δεδεγμἐνος
          • 10.2.3.3 Cooperation and contest
          • 10.2.3.4 The Panathenaic rule
          • 10.2.3.5 οἴμη and οἶμος
          • 10.2.3.6 ὕυͅνος
        • 10.2.4 Earliest attestations of ῥαψῳδός
        • 10.2.5 The differentia of the rhapsodic craft
        • 10.2.6 Stitching or weaving?
  • Part IV. Rhapsodic Performance in the Late Classical and Post-Classical Periods
    • 11. The Performance of Drama and Epic in Late-Classical Athens
      • 11.1 The Reforms of Lykourgos
      • 11.2 Demetrios of Phaleron and the Rhapsodes
        • 11.2.1 Rhapsodes and homēristai
        • 11.2.2 The reforms of Demetrios of Phaleron
      • 11.3 Actors at the Panathenaia?
    • 12. The Performance of Homer after IV BC
      • 12.1 The Τεχνῖται of Dionysos
      • 12.2 The Τεχνῖται and Specialization
      • 12.3 Rhapsodes in the Inscriptional Record
        • 12.3.1 Prosopography of rhapsodes
  • Part V. Aristotle on Performance
    • 13. Rhapsodic hypokrisis and Aristotelian lexis
      • 13.1 Why Aristotle on Ὑπόκρισις Matters
      • 13.2 Relationship between Λέξις and Ὑπόκρισις
      • 13.3 Ὑπόκρισις, Not a Detour
      • 13.4 Ὑπόκρισις, Not Just in Rhetoric III.1
      • 13.5 Semantic Development of Ὑπόκρισις and Λέξις
        • 13.5.1 Φαντασία, ‘mere fancy’?
      • 13.6 Φαντασία in the Rhetoric
    • 14. The Aristotelian tekhnē of hypokrisis
      • 14.1 Technical hypokrisis
      • 14.2 Hypokrisis and the Use of Writing
  • Conclusion
  • Appendix: The Origin of the Term hypokritēs
  • Bibliography
  • Index of Ancient Literary Sources
  • Index of Documentary Sources
  • Index of Rhapsodes
  • Index of Greek Terms
  • General Index

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