Cover: Forgotten Wars: Freedom and Revolution in Southeast Asia, from Harvard University PressCover: Forgotten Wars in PAPERBACK

Forgotten Wars

Freedom and Revolution in Southeast Asia

Add to Cart

Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.50 • £19.95 • €22.00

ISBN 9780674057074

Publication Date: 10/30/2010

Academic Trade

704 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

16 halftones

Belknap Press

United States and its dependencies only

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Maps
    • Asia in late 1945
    • The Great Crescent
    • British South East Asia
    • The Partition of East Bengal
    • British Malaya in 1945
  • Some Key Characters
  • Preface
  • Prologue: An Unending War
  • 1. 1945: Interregnum
    • The New Asia
    • The last journey of Subhas Chandra Bose
    • Nations without states
    • Three weeks in Malaya
    • The fall of Syonan
  • 2. 1945: The Pains of Victory
    • Burma intransigent
    • India: the key
    • Bengal on the brink
    • The reckoning
  • 3. 1945: A Second Colonial Conquest
    • ‘Black Market Administration’
    • A world upside down
    • Liberal imperialism and New Democracy
    • ‘Malaya for the Malays, not the Malayans’
  • 4. 1945: The First Wars of Peace
    • The crescent regained
    • Britain’s forgotten war in Vietnam
    • Britain and the birth of Indonesia
    • Freedom or death in Surabaya
  • 5. 1946: Freedom without Borders
    • The passing of the Malayan Spring
    • Hang Tuah and Hang Jebat
    • British and Indian mutinies
    • Dorman-Smith’s Waterloo
    • A new world order?
  • 6. 1946: One Empire Unravels, Another Is Born
    • The killing begins
    • Britain’s terminal crisis in Burma
    • The burial of the dead
    • Business as usual in Malaya
  • 7. 1947: At Freedom’s Gate
    • The last days of the Raj
    • The crescent fragments: Bengal divided
    • Tragedy in Rangoon
    • Disaster approaches
  • 8. 1947: Malaya on the Brink
    • The crescent fragments: orphans of empire
    • Malaya’s forgotten regiments
    • The strange disappearance of Mr Wright
    • ‘Beware, the danger from the mountain’
    • A people’s constitution
  • 9. 1948: A Bloody Dawn
    • Boys’ Day in Burma
    • The genesis of communist rebellion
    • A summer of anarchy
    • Karens and Britons
    • India recedes, India reborn
  • 10. 1948: The Malayan Revolution
    • A third world war?
    • The frontier erupts
    • Calls to arms
    • Sten guns and stengahs
    • The road to Batang Kali
  • 11. 1949: The Centre Barely Holds
    • Britain, India and the coming of the Cold War
    • The centre barely holds
    • The battle for the ulu
    • Freedom and revolution
    • The generation of 1950
  • Epilogue: The End of Britain’s Asian Empire
    • Freedom, slowly and gently
    • Freedom from fear?
    • Flawed memories
    • A flawed inheritance
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * List of Illustrations
    • 1. Surrendered Japanese troops in Burma, August 1945 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 2. Japanese troops clearing the Singapore Padang before the surrender ceremony, 12 September 1945 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 3. Lt General Seishiro Itagaki signing the surrender, Singapore, 12 September 1945 (Empics)
    • 4. Mountbatten announces the surrender of the Japanese in Singapore, September, 1945 (Corbis)
    • 5. A forgotten army: surrendered Japanese in north Malaya, November 1945 (Empics)
    • 6. Seagrave’s return, 1945 (Getty)
    • 7. Leclerc and Gracey with Japanese sword of surrender, Saigon, 1945 (Corbis)
    • 8. Soldiers of the Parachute Regiment, Java, 1945 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 9. Bengal sappers and miners watch the reprisal burning of the village of Bekassi, Java, 1945 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 10. Imperialism’s return? Christison in Java, 1946 (Getty)
    • 11. Sukarno addresses an ‘ocean’ rally, Java, 1946 (Getty)
    • 12. Charisma and revolution: Sukarno, Java, 1946 (Getty)
    • 13. Nehru’s arrival at Kalling Airport, Singapore, April 1946 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 14. Macdonald inspects the Malay Regiment, Kuala Lumpur, 1946 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 15. Dorman Smith leaves Burma, June 1946 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 16. Muslim rioters and the corpse of a Hindu, Calcutta, August 1946 (Corbis)
    • 17. India’s interim government at their swearing in, Delhi 1946 (Corbis)
    • 18. Aung San and Attlee, London, January 1947 (Getty)
    • 19. Aung San and family, 1947 (Popperfoto)
    • 20. The Mountbattens in Delhi, eve of independence, August 1947 (Getty)
    • 21. Celebrating independence in Calcutta, August 1947 (Getty)
    • 22. Ending the Burmese days: Rance and Burma’s president, January 1948 (Corbis)
    • 23. Communist suspect, Malaya c. 1949 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 24. Bren gun and stengah: rubber planter in Malaya, 1949 (Getty)
    • 25. Chinese peasants being arrested by Malay policemen, April 1949 (Getty)
    • 26. Dyak trackers in Malaya, c. 1949 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 27. The sultan expects: the ruler of Selangor inspects Malay special constables on rubber estate, 1949 (Imperial War Museum)
    • 28. Hearts and minds: a propaganda leaflet drop, 1948 (Imperial War Musuem)
    • 29. Imperial Twilight: Drinks party at Malcolm MacDonald’s residence, Bukit Serene, 1949 (Getty)
    • 30. Fighting during the Karen insurgency, 1949 (Getty)
    • 31. The quiet man: Ne Win in London for military training, 1949 (Corbis)
    • 32. The man with the plan: Templer with the Home Guard, Kinta, 1942 (Getty)
    • 33. Bandung spirits: Nasser, Nu and Nehru celebrating the Burmese Water Festival, 1955 (Corbis)
    • 34. Chin Peng at Baling, December 1955, with his old Force 136 ally, John Davis (Corbis)

From Our Blog

Photo of Lucia Jacobs as a child sitting next to Oaky

How to Plant a Forest

For this week’s University Press Week Blog Tour, Lucia Jacobs offers us a glimpse of environmental stewardship as seen through the activities of the ubiquitous squirrel, a species native to the Americas, Africa, and Eurasia from the Eocene Epoch onward. Lucia Jacobs is Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the

‘manifold glories of classical Greek and Latin’

The digital Loeb Classical Library (loebclassics.com) extends the founding mission of James Loeb with an interconnected, fully searchable, perpetually growing virtual library of all that is important in Greek and Latin literature.