DUMBARTON OAKS MEDIEVAL LIBRARY
Cover: One Hundred Latin Hymns: Ambrose to Aquinas, from Harvard University PressCover: One Hundred Latin Hymns in HARDCOVER

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library 18

One Hundred Latin Hymns

Ambrose to Aquinas

Edited and translated by Peter G. Walsh

With Christopher Husch

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674057739

Publication Date: 11/19/2012

Short

544 pages

5-1/4 x 8 inches

Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library

World

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“How I wept at your hymns and songs, keenly moved by the sweet-sounding voices of your church!” wrote the recently converted Augustine in his Confessions. Christians from the earliest period consecrated the hours of the day and the sacred calendar, liturgical seasons and festivals of saints. This volume collects one hundred of the most important and beloved Late Antique and Medieval Latin hymns from Western Europe.

These religious voices span a geographical range that stretches from Ireland through France to Spain and Italy. They meditate on the ineffable, from Passion to Paradise, in love and trembling and praise. The authors represented here range from Ambrose in the late fourth century CE down to Bonaventure in the thirteenth. The texts cover a broad gamut in their poetic forms and meters. Although often the music has not survived, most of them would have been sung. Some of them have continued to inspire composers, such as the great thirteenth-century hymns, the Stabat mater and Dies irae.

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