Cover: The Harvard Sampler: Liberal Education for the Twenty-First Century, from Harvard University PressCover: The Harvard Sampler in HARDCOVER

The Harvard Sampler

Liberal Education for the Twenty-First Century

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.95 • £23.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674059023

Publication Date: 10/15/2011

Short

392 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

8 color illustrations, 20 halftones, 4 tables

World

  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Enhancing Religious Literacy in a Liberal Arts Education through the Study of Islam and Muslim Societies [Ali S. Asani]
  • American Literature and the American Environment: There Never Was an “Is” without a “Where” [Lawrence Buell]
  • The Internet and Hieronymus Bosch: Fear, Protection, and Liberty in Cyberspace [Harry R. Lewis]
  • Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution: Pattern, Process, and the Evidence [Jonathan B. Losos]
  • Global History for an Era of Globalization: An Introduction [Charles S. Maier]
  • Medical Detectives [Karin B. Michels]
  • The Human Mind [Steven Pinker]
  • Securing Human Rights Intellectually: Philosophical Inquiries about the Universal Declaration [Mathias Risse]
  • What Is Morality? [T. M. Scanlon]
  • Energy Resources and the Environment: A Chapter on Applied Science [John H. Shaw]
  • Interracial Literature [Werner Sollors]
  • “Pursuits of Happiness”: Dark Threads in the History of the American Revolution [Laurel Thatcher Ulrich]

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