THE W. E. B. DU BOIS LECTURES
Cover: Seeing Through Race, from Harvard University PressCover: Seeing Through Race in HARDCOVER

Seeing Through Race

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$29.00 • £23.95 • €26.00

ISBN 9780674059818

Publication Date: 05/29/2012

Short

248 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

16 halftones, 3 line illustrations

The W. E. B. Du Bois Lectures

World

A must-read book for anyone struggling to think outside the racial boxes in which we have been enclosed too long. With characteristic verve and originality, Mitchell breaks through the binaries that have shaped the discourse about race in an ostensibly post-racial America, challenging us to see race as a consequence rather than a cause of racism.—Elizabeth Abel, University of California, Berkeley

Seeing Through Race engages with one of the most contested concepts of our time while raising new questions and offering new insights. What Mitchell proposes with regard to race and media is akin to the rethinking of sex and gender in Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble, or to the turning of the tables performed on the ethics of violence by Talal Asad in On Suicide Bombing.—Gil Anidjar, Columbia University

This is a brilliant provocation to see anew how we see the world through images bearing on race, but didn’t know we were so doing. Extending his lifelong inquiry into how images work in everyday life as well as in the realm of art history and theory, the author releases the liberatory potential of images. W.E.B. Du Bois would, I believe, be most pleased with these almighty clever and passionate lectures recently delivered at Harvard in his name.—Michael Taussig, Columbia University

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