Cover: Desert Hell: The British Invasion of Mesopotamia, from Harvard University PressCover: Desert Hell in HARDCOVER

Desert Hell

The British Invasion of Mesopotamia

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674059993

Publication Date: 03/31/2011

Short

624 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

16 halftones, 3 maps

Belknap Press

United States and its dependencies only

  • List of Plates
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Author’s Note
  • Maps
  • Introduction
  • Part I: Basra
    • 1. Into Mesopotamia
    • 2. ‘An unexpected stroke’
    • 3. Turks and Indians
    • 4. Basra
    • 5. ‘Conciliating the Arabs’
    • 6. Qurna
    • 7. ‘Morally responsible to humanity and to civilization’
    • 8. ‘One of the decisive battles of the world’
    • 9. Townshend’s Regatta
    • 10. Up the Euphrates
    • 11. To Kut
  • Part II: Kut
    • 1. To Baghdad?
    • 2. To Salman Pak
    • 3. Ctesiphon
    • 4. Retreat
    • 5. Under Siege
    • 6. To the Rescue
    • 7. Marking Time
    • 8. Flood and Famine
    • 9. Dujaila: The Second Battle for Kut
    • 10. Failure
    • 11. Surrender
  • Part III: Baghdad
    • 1. Policy Paralysed: Egypt v. India
    • 2. Administration and Punishment
    • 3. Retooling the Army
    • 4. Captivity
    • 5. Inquiry
    • 6. Maude’s Offensive: The Third Battle for Kut
    • 7. Baghdad at Last
    • 8. Maude’s Moment
  • Part IV: Mosul
    • 1. Northern Exposure
    • 2. Maude’s End
    • 3. Strengthening the Hold
    • 4. Caucasian Fantasies
    • 5. Victory
    • 6. Self-Determination?
    • 7. Retrenchment
    • 8. Rebellion
    • 9. Kingdom Come
    • 10. Kurdistan for the Kurds?
    • 11. The World Decides
  • Afterword
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index

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