Cover: Lydian Architecture in HARDCOVER

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis Reports 5

Lydian Architecture

Ashlar Masonry Structures at Sardis

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$85.00 • £68.95 • €76.50

ISBN 9780674060609

Publication Date: 06/13/2011

Text

320 pages

170 black-and-white photographs, 116 line illustrations

Archaeological Exploration of Sardis > Archaeological Exploration of Sardis Reports

World

From the sixth to the fourth century B.C., the western Anatolian region of Lydia was home to a distinctive local tradition of ashlar masonry construction. The earliest datable example of fine stone masonry in the environs of Sardis, the capital of the Lydian empire, is the tomb of King Alyattes, who died in ca. 560 B.C. Contemporary monuments include a city gate and monumental terraces. Alyattes’ son Croesus was overthrown by the Persians in 547 B.C., but the Lydian building tradition survived in chamber tombs at Sardis and throughout Lydia.

This richly illustrated volume examines the monuments of Sardis and environs in the context of contemporary developments in Lydia and throughout the ancient Mediterranean and Near East. The study of Lydian architecture illuminates traditions of Anatolian kingship, technological exchange between Lydia and Greece and the Near East, and the origins of Persian imperial architecture.

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