Cover: Saturday Is for Funerals, from Harvard University PressCover: Saturday Is for Funerals in PAPERBACK

Saturday Is for Funerals

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$18.50 • £14.95 • €16.50

ISBN 9780674061835

Publication Date: 10/15/2011

Academic Trade

240 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

World

  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • 1. A Family of Funerals: The Epidemic
  • 2. I Know You Still Love Me: Sexual Transmission
  • 3. Masego and Katlego: Mother-to-Child Transmission
  • 4. Mandla Gets Tested: Diagnosis of HIV Infection
  • 5. The Death of Mma Monica: AIDS Disease in Adults and Availability of Treatment
  • 6. Naledi and Her Nephew Shima: AIDS in Children
  • 7. It Is the Will of God: HIV and Tuberculosis
  • 8. Walking Skeletons and Hesitant Hugs: Toxicities and Resistance to Drugs Used to Treat HIV/AIDS
  • 9. The Page Is Turning Red: Blood Transfusion as a Risk for HIV Infection
  • 10. A Tribal Tradition: Male Circumcision to Prevent HIV Infection
  • 11. A Matter of Commitment: Development of an HIV Vaccine
  • 12. Ancestral Control: Evil Spirits and HIV as the Cause of AIDS
  • 13. He Died in China: Fear and Stigma
  • 14. Opelo’s Rebellion: Issues of Adolescents and Women
  • 15. Desperation for Pono: Orphans of HIV/AIDS
  • 16. Government Action Makes a Difference: A Nation Responds
  • Glossary
  • Further Reading
  • Index

Awards & Accolades

  • Honorable Mention, 2010 Association of American Publishers PROSE Award, Clinical Medicine Category
  • A Choice Outstanding Academic Title of 2010
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