HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Reading North Korea: An Ethnological Inquiry, from Harvard University PressCover: Reading North Korea in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 341

Reading North Korea

An Ethnological Inquiry

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.95 • £31.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674062474

Publication Date: 05/07/2012

Text

244 pages

6 x 9 inches

4 black and white illustrations

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Often depicted as one of the world’s most strictly isolationist and relentlessly authoritarian regimes, North Korea has remained terra incognita to foreign researchers as a site for anthropological fieldwork. Given the difficulty of gaining access to the country and its people, is it possible to examine the cultural logic and social dynamics of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea?

In this innovative book, Sonia Ryang casts new light onto the study of North Korean culture and society by reading literary texts as sources of ethnographic data. Analyzing and interpreting the rituals and language embodied in a range of literary works published in the 1970s and 1980s, Ryang focuses critical attention on three central themes—love, war, and self—that reflect the nearly complete overlap of the personal, social, and political realms in North Korean society. The ideology embedded in these propagandistic works laid the cultural foundation for the nation as a “perpetual ritual state,” where social structures and personal relations are suspended in tribute to Kim Il Sung, the political and spiritual leader who died in 1994 but lives eternally in the hearts of his people and still weaves the social fabric of present-day North Korea.

From Our Blog

(logo) SpeakOUT: 50th Anniversary

Speaking with SpeakOut Boston

We continue our celebration of Pride Month by talking with some of the speakers who volunteer with SpeakOUT Boston. They share their stories with a variety of audiences to foster a better understanding of the LGBTQ+ community, so we thought we’d ask them some questions of our own.