HELLENIC STUDIES SERIES
Cover: Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space, from Harvard University PressCover: Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space in PAPERBACK

Hellenic Studies Series 56

Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$24.95 • £19.95 • €22.50

ISBN 9780674066625

Publication Date: 02/25/2013

Text

282 pages

6 x 9 inches

4 black and white line illustrations, 4 black and white photographs, 2 maps

Center for Hellenic Studies > Hellenic Studies Series

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Imperial Geographies in Byzantine and Ottoman Space opens new and insightful vistas on the nexus between empire and geography. The volume redirects attention from the Atlantic to the space of the eastern Mediterranean shaped by two empires of remarkable duration and territorial extent, the Byzantine and the Ottoman. The essays offer a diachronic and comparative account that spans the medieval and early modern periods and reaches into the nineteenth century. Methodologically rich, the essays combine historical, literary, and theoretical perspectives. Through texts as diverse as court records and chancery manuals, imperial treatises and fictional works, travel literature and theatrical adaptations, the essays explore ways in which the production of geographical knowledge supported imperial authority or revealed its precarious mastery of geography.

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