PROCEEDINGS OF THE HARVARD CELTIC COLLOQUIUM
Cover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 31: 2011, from Harvard University PressCover: Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 31: 2011 in HARDCOVER

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium, 31: 2011

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$32.95 • £26.95 • €29.50

ISBN 9780674066786

Publication Date: 10/22/2012

Text

350 pages

6 black and white photographs

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium

World, subsidiary rights restricted

Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium has in its purview all aspects of culture, language, and history of the Celtic peoples, from ancient to modern times.

PHCC, 31 features “Culture, Identity and the Medieval Revival in Victorian Wales,” the 2011 J. V. Kelleher lecture given by Huw Pryce of Bangor University, Wales, which looks at Victorian views of the past in Wales. The volume also considers the linguistic shifts in several of the Celtic languages, both in early periods and more recent times, and it contains articles concerning the history, culture, and literatures of Ireland, Wales, and Cornwall.

In addition, PHCC, 31 includes several articles on historiography in various areas and times, as well as others that examine later reflections on the Easter Rising in Ireland (1916), the renewed interest in regional language in Cornwall, the historic reflexes of the title Bragmaticus, and literary reflexes of archaeological remains in medieval Wales.

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Jacket: The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, by Khalil Gibran Muhammad, from Harvard University Press

“Predictive Policing” and Racial Profiling

While technology used in policing has improved, it hasn’t progressed, says Khalil Gibran Muhammad, if racial biases are built into those new technologies. This excerpt from his book, The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America, shows that for the reform called for by the current protests against systemic racism and racially-biased policing to be fulfilled, the police—especially those at the top—will need to change their pre-programmed views on race and the way they see the Black citizens they are supposed to “serve and protect.”