I TATTI STUDIES IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE HISTORY
Cover: Cultures of Charity: Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy, from Harvard University PressCover: Cultures of Charity in HARDCOVER

Cultures of Charity

Women, Politics, and the Reform of Poor Relief in Renaissance Italy

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$57.00 • £45.95 • €51.50

ISBN 9780674067097

Publication Date: 02/15/2013

Text

400 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

3 halftones, 13 line illustrations, 4 tables

I Tatti Studies in Italian Renaissance History

World

Renaissance Italians pioneered radical changes in ways of helping the poor, including orphanages, workhouses, pawnshops, and women’s shelters. Nicholas Terpstra shows that gender was the key factor driving innovation. Most of the recipients of charity were women. The most creative new plans focused on features of women’s poverty like illegitimate births, hunger, unemployment, and domestic violence. Signal features of the reforms, from forced labor to new instruments of saving and lending, were devised specifically to help young women get a start in life.

Cultures of Charity is the first book to see women’s poverty as the key factor driving changes to poor relief. These changes generated intense political debates as proponents of republican democracy challenged more elitist and authoritarian forms of government emerging at the time. Should taxes fund poor relief? Could forced labor help build local industry? Focusing on Bologna, Terpstra looks at how these fights around politics and gender generated pioneering forms of poor relief, including early examples of maternity benefits, unemployment insurance, food stamps, and credit union savings plans.

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