Cover: The Eagle Unbowed: Poland and the Poles in the Second World War, from Harvard University PressCover: The Eagle Unbowed in HARDCOVER

The Eagle Unbowed

Poland and the Poles in the Second World War

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$36.00 • £28.95 • €32.50

ISBN 9780674068148

Publication Date: 11/27/2012

Trade

784 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

32 halftones, 8 maps

United States and its dependencies only

  • List of Illustrations*
  • List of Maps**
  • Acknowledgements
  • Abbreviations
  • Definitions of Poland and the Poles
  • Guide to Polish Pronunciation
  • Preface
  • 1. The Rebirth of Poland
  • 2. Polish Foreign Policy, 1920–1939
  • 3. The September 1939 Campaign
  • 4. The German and Soviet Occupation of Poland to June 1941
  • 5. Exile in the Soviet Union
  • 6. Escape from the Soviet Union
  • 7. Poland’s Contribution to the Allied War Effort, 1940–1943
  • 8. Polish Non-combatants Outside Poland, 1939–1945
  • 9. The Dark Years: Occupied Poland, 1941–1943
  • 10. The Holocaust, 1941–1943
  • 11. Sikorski’s Diplomacy, 1941–1943
  • 12. Threats to the Standing of the Polish Government-in-Exile and the Polish Underground Authorities
  • 13. The Polish Dilemma: The Retreat of the Germans and the Advance of the Red Army
  • 14. Poland: The Inconvenient Ally
  • 15. Fighting under British Command, 1943–1945
  • 16. The End of the War
  • 17. The Aftermath of the War
  • 18. The Final Chapter
  • Appendix 1: Order of Battle of the Polish Army, 1939–1945
  • Appendix 2: Principal Polish Personalities
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Illustrations:
    • 1. Annual commemoration of Piłsudski’s counteroffensive
    • 2. Troops from the Warsaw garrison after the surrender
    • 3. German troops taking down Polish government symbols
    • 4. Soviet troops marching through Wilno
    • 5. A column of Jews guarded by German soldiers is marched through the streets of Warsaw
    • 6. Polish POWs doing reconstruction work
    • 7. Sikorski, Zaleski and Raczyński
    • 8. Polish refugees in Rumania
    • 9. Raczyński, Sikorski, Churchill, Zaleski and Attlee signing the agreement between Poland and the United Kingdom
    • 10. Clementine and Winston Churchill and Sikorski in Fife
    • 11. Antoni Głowacki with a fellow pilot during the Battle of Britain
    • 12. Polish Army howitzer training exercise
    • 13. The footbridge connecting the ‘Small Ghetto’ to the ‘Large Ghetto’ in Warsaw
    • 14. Raid on the Warsaw Ghetto
    • 15. Polish refugees from the Soviet Union in Iran
    • 16. General Władysław Anders and Sikorski
    • 17. Starving Poles on arrival in Iran
    • 18. Orphaned Polish boys on PE parade in Palestine
    • 19. The site of the Katyń massacre
    • 20. The Warsaw ghetto uprising
    • 21. The Warsaw ghetto uprising
    • 22. Tanks of the 1st Polish Armoured Division in Normandy
    • 23. Troops of the 3rd Carpathian Rifles Division at Monte Cassino
    • 24. Scene at Majdanek after Soviet liberation
    • 25. General Berling and members of the Polish Committee of National Liberation
    • 26. Troops of the Armia Krajowa with captured Germans
    • 27. Funeral of an AK soldier
    • 28. General Tadeusz ‘Bór’ Komorowski
    • 29. Soldiers of the 1st Polish Armoured Division after liberating Breda
    • 30. Polish and Soviet women slave-workers in Germany
    • 31. Polish male prisoners at Dachau after liberation
    • 32. Thousands of Polish troops aboard SS Banfora at Tilbury Docks
  • ** Maps:
    • 1. The Second Polish Republic, 1922–1939
    • 2. The Pre-war Republic showing the Curzon Line and Curzon Line B
    • 3. The German and Soviet Invasions of Poland
    • 4. The Division of Poland between Germany and the Soviet Union
    • 5. Poland Post-Barbarossa
    • 6. Principal Extermination and Concentration Camps
    • 7. The Warsaw Uprising
    • 8. Poland in 1945 with Territorial Losses and Gains

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene