WONDERS OF THE WORLD
Cover: Stonehenge, from Harvard University PressCover: Stonehenge in PAPERBACK

Stonehenge

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$30.00 • £24.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674072299

Publication Date: 05/06/2013

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256 pages

32 halftones, 2 maps

Wonders of the World

North America only

For several hundred years, people have believed that Stonehenge is connected to the druids, so ardently that public outcry eventually drove the government, which had closed the monument to keep it from vandalism and other deterioration, reopened it for latter-day druidic ceremonies on the summer solstice. Such is the power of the most popular understanding of Stonehenge. Readable and well-researched, this is an excellent primer on that and the other varying ways that people have interpreted the enigmatic and iconographic arrangement of stones, ranging from theater for human sacrifice to ‘carhenge’ and other ironic re-creations.—Patricia Monaghan, Booklist

[A] witty, erudite book… [Hill’s] book is a treasure: stylish, thoughtful, miraculously condensed, and as full of knowledge as a megalith is full of megalith.—John Carey, The Sunday Times

Awards & Accolades

  • 2010 Historians of British Art Book Prize, Pre-1800 Category
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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene