Cover: The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double-Consciousness, from Harvard University PressCover: The Black Atlantic in PAPERBACK

The Black Atlantic

Modernity and Double-Consciousness

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$34.00 • £27.95 • €30.50

ISBN 9780674076068

Publication Date: 03/15/1995

Short

280 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

Not for sale in UK & British Commonwealth (except Canada)

His most influential work, use[s] the writings of enslaved people and their descendants to demonstrate their centrality to the making of the modern world… In this moment of resurgent anti-racist politics, people are turning to Gilroy’s work… [His] reputation in the field is unrivalled.—Yohann Koshy, The Guardian (2021)

The Black Atlantic uses the transnational concept of the diaspora to explore the migrations, discontinuities, fractal patterns of exchange and hybrid glory that join the black cultures of America, Britain, and the Caribbean to one another and to Africa. Gilroy isn’t the first to chart the Black Atlantic, but he is the first to situate it… It is a bold and brilliant rethinking of the political geography of race.—Eric Lott, The Nation

Against the grain of much contemporary thought that embraces ethnocentrism, Paul Gilroy has issued a stirring challenge to recognize the modern world as a cultural hybrid. The Black Atlantic is a wonderful chapter in the global intellectual history of the next century… Drawing on work in many disciplines, Gilroy provides a vivid alternative to competing positions in the current culture wars. He briefly outlines an intellectual rapprochement between Zionism and black nationalism, for example, and some of his most polemical remarks are reserved for those Afrocentrists who proclaim a linear inheritance from Africa but wish to ignore the intervening cultural hybridization produced by slavery… Present anxiety about the supposed disuniting and fraying of America’s national culture, or about its forced concentration into an assimilating mold, might be significantly allayed if readers would pay serious attention to the invigorating claims of The Black Atlantic.—Eric J. Sundquist, Newsday

Building on W. E. B. Du Bois’s early 20th-century theories of race and double-consciousness and taking Du Bois’s own transatlantic career as a paradigmatic instance of the modernism of black experiences of diaspora, Gilroy accomplishes an exciting recharting of the complexities of black thought in the West… [The] book has the additional merit of providing remarkable rereadings of Du Bois, Richard Wright, Martin Delany, Frederick Douglass and others.—Aldon L. Nielsen, Washington Post Book World

Spike Lee and Jazzie B., Walter Benjamin and the Jubilee Singers, Sonia Boyce and Keith Piper, Richard Wright, Theodor Adorno, J. M. W. Turner and W. E. B. Du Bois, Hegel, Hendrix, and 2 Live Crew: Very few writers could find things to say about every character on so dazzlingly eclectic a cast-list. Perhaps only Paul Gilroy could offer not merely striking insights about all of them, but present a compelling case for their belonging in the same narrative… Gilroy’s lucidity is exemplary.—Stephen Howe, New Statesman & Society

A thoughtful evaluation of Western black identity, and a scathing critique of the nationalist, ‘ethical absolutist’ position that posits that such identities are mutually exclusive… There is much to recommend about [it]: many thought-provoking questions and compelling arguments.—Carrie B. Robinson, Quarterly Black Review of Books

This book’s many virtues of style combine with elegant local readings of Douglass, Wright, Du Bois, Morrison; of Adorno and Baumann; and a whole range of popular culture from jazz to Hip Hop… It is a mark of the ambition and the achievement of this book that so many readers will find it rewarding.—Kwame Anthony Appiah, Harvard University

This is a splendid book… Gilroy’s main contribution to scholarship is that by inserting black people as central participants in the creation of the modern world he thereby rewrites the history of modernity and modernism.—Hazel Carby, Yale University

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