Cover: A Natural History of Human Morality, from Harvard University PressCover: A Natural History of Human Morality in HARDCOVER

A Natural History of Human Morality

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$39.00 • £31.95 • €35.00

ISBN 9780674088641

Publication Date: 01/04/2016

Text

208 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

6 line illustrations

World

Tomasello is convincing, above all, because he has run many of the relevant studies (on chimps, bonobos and children) himself. He concludes by emphasizing the powerful influence of broad cultural groups on modern humans… Tomasello also makes an endearing guide, appearing happily amazed that morality exists at all.—Michael Bond, New Scientist

If you’re after a definitive guide to explain how humans became an ultra-cooperative and, eventually, moral species, this must be it. Evolutionary anthropologist Michael Tomasello has followed his last book, A Natural History of Human Thinking, with another hard hitter.New Scientist

This is an extremely worthwhile addition to the literature on the evolution of morality. It is well written and strikes an excellent balance between easy accessibility and nuanced and novel ideas. This book will appeal to students and researchers from a range of disciplines.—Richard Joyce, author of The Evolution of Morality

This is an important synthesis of the ideas Tomasello has been developing over a number of years, extended with an offer of a philosophically relevant genealogy of morality. Readers will learn much from this informed review of the extensive literature on the evolution of morality—a substantial part of which consists of the major contributions Tomasello and his colleagues have made.—Philip Kitcher, author of The Ethical Project

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