CARL NEWELL JACKSON LECTURES
Cover: The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640–740, from Harvard University PressCover: The Empire That Would Not Die in HARDCOVER

The Empire That Would Not Die

The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640–740

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$49.00 • £39.95 • €44.00

ISBN 9780674088771

Publication Date: 04/29/2016

Text

432 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

7 maps, 1 graph, 3 tables

Carl Newell Jackson Lectures

World

  • List of Illustrations and Tables*
  • Note on Names
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction: Goldilocks in Byzantium
  • 1. The Challenge: A Framework for Collapse
  • 2. Beliefs, Narratives, and the Moral Universe
  • 3. Identities, Divisions, and Solidarities
  • 4. Elites and Interests
  • 5. Regional Variation and Resistance
  • 6. Some Environmental Factors
  • 7. Organization, Cohesion, and Survival
  • A Conclusion
  • Abbreviations
  • Notes
  • Glossary
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Illustrations and Tables
    • Maps
      • 1.1 The Umayyad caliphate, ca. 720
      • 1.2 The Taurus and Anti-Taurus region, ca. 740
      • 6.1 Anatolia: Seasonal rainfall régime zones
      • 6.2 Agricultural production and land use, ca. 500–1000 CE
      • 6.3 Location of Lake Nar region
      • 6.4 Sources of grain in the seventh century CE
      • 7.1 Seventh-century military commands and notional divisional strengths, overlain on late Roman provinces
    • Figure
      • 6.1 Summary of vegetation, land use, and climate change, Nar Gólü, Cappadocia, 300–1400 CE
    • Tables
      • 6.1 Varying estimated end dates for the BOP in Anatolia
      • 6.2 Patterns of agrarian production from the seventh century CE in Anatolia
      • 6.3 Summary interpretation of high-resolution pollen and stable isotope data, Lake Nar, 270–1400 CE

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