Cover: The Child’s Understanding of Number, from Harvard University PressCover: The Child’s Understanding of Number in PAPERBACK

The Child’s Understanding of Number

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$31.50 • £25.95 • €28.50

ISBN 9780674116375

Publication Date: 01/01/1986

Academic Trade

280 pages

6 x 9-1/4 inches

17 tables, 12 line illustrations

World

Related Subjects

The publication of this book may mark a sea change in the way that we think about cognitive development. For the past two decades, the emphasis has been on young children’s limitations… Now a new trend is emerging: to challenge the original assumption of young children’s cognitive incapacity. The Child’s Understanding of Number represents the most original and provocative manifestation to date of this new trend.Contemporary Psychology

Here at last is the book we have been waiting for, or at any rate known we needed, on the young child and number. The authors are at once sophisticated in their own understanding of number and rich in psychological intuition. They present a wealth of good experiments to support and guide their intuitions. And all is told in so simple and unalarming a manner that even the most pusillanimous will be able to read with enjoyment.Canadian Journal of Psychology

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene