Cover: Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, Volumes I and II: Principles of Philosophy and Elements of Logic in HARDCOVER

Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, Volumes I and II: Principles of Philosophy and Elements of Logic

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$312.00 • £249.95 • €281.00

ISBN 9780674138001

Publication Date: 01/01/1932

Short

962 pages

6 x 9 inches

23 line illustrations

Belknap Press

Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce

World

Related Subjects

  • Introduction
  • Preface
  • Book I. General Historical Orientation
    • 1. Lessons from the History of Philosophy
      • 1. Nominalism
      • 2. Conceptualism
      • 3. The Spirit of Scholasticism
      • 4. Kant and his Refutation of Idealism
      • 5. Hegelism
    • 2. Lessons from the History of Science
      • 1. The Scientific Attitude
      • 2. The Scientific Imagination
      • 3. Science and Morality
      • 4. Mathematics
      • 5. Science as a Guide to Conduct
      • 6. Morality and Sham Reasoning
      • 7. The Method of Authority
      • 8. Science and Continuity
      • 9. The Analytic Method
      • 10. Kinds of Reasoning
      • 11. The Study of the Useless
      • 12. Il Lume Naturale
      • 13. Generalization and Abstraction
      • 14. The Evaluation of Exactitude
      • 15. Science and Extraordinary Phenomena
      • 16. Reasoning from Samples
      • 17. The Method of Residual Phenomena
      • 18. Observation
      • 19. Evolution
      • 20. Some A Priori Dicta
      • 21. The Paucity of Scientific Knowledge
      • 22. The Uncertainty of Scientific Results
      • 23. Economy of Research
    • 3. Notes on Scientific Philosophy
      • 1. Laboratory and Seminary Philosophies
      • 2. Axioms
      • 3. The Observational Part of Philosophy
      • 4. The First Rule of Reason
      • 5. Fallibilism, Continuity, and Evolution
  • Book II. The Classification of the Sciences
    • Proem: The Architectonic Character of Philosophy
    • 1. An Outline Classification of the Sciences
    • 2. A Detailed Classification of the Sciences
      • 1. Natural Classes
      • 2. Natural Classifications
      • 3. The Essence of Science
      • 4. The Divisions of Science
      • 5. The Divisions of Philosophy
      • 6. The Divisions of Mathematics
  • Book III. Phenomenology
    • 1. Introduction
      • 1. The Phaneron
      • 2. Valencies
      • 3. Monads, Dyads, and Triads
      • 4. Indecomposable Elements
    • 2. The Categories in Detail
      • A. Firstness
        • 1. The Source of the Categories
        • 2. The Manifestation of Firstness
        • 3. The Monad
        • 4. Qualities of Feeling
        • 5. Feeling as Independent of Mind and Change
        • 6. A Definition of Feeling
        • 7. The Similarity of Feelings of Different Sensory Modes
        • 8. Presentments as Signs
        • 9. The Communicability of Feelings
        • 10. The Transition to Secondness
      • B. Secondness
        • 1. Feeling and Struggle
        • 2. Action and Perception
        • 3. The Varieties of Secondness
        • 4. The Dyad
        • 5. Polar Distinctions and Volition
        • 6. Ego and Non-Ego
        • 7. Shock and the Sense of Change
      • C. Thirdness
        • 1. Examples of Thirdness
        • 2. Representation and Generality
        • 3. The Reality of Thirdness
        • 4. Protoplasm and the Categories
        • 5. The Interdependence of the Categories
    • 3. A Guess at the Riddle
      • Plan of the Work
      • 1. Trichotomy
      • 2. The Triad in Reasoning
      • 3. The Triad in Metaphysics
      • 4. The Triad in Psychology
      • 5. The Triad in Physiology
      • 6. The Triad in Biological Development
      • 7. The Triad in Physics
    • 4. The Logic of Mathematics; An Attempt to Develop My Categories from Within
      • 1. The Three Categories
      • 2. Quality
      • 3. Fact
      • 4. Dyads
      • 5. Triads
    • 5. Degenerate Cases
      • 1. Kinds of Secondness
      • 2. The Firstness of Firstness, Secondness and Thirdness
    • 6. On a New List of Categories
      • 1. Original Statement
      • 2. Notes on the Preceding
    • 7. Triadomany
  • Book IV. The Normative Sciences
    • 1. Introduction
    • 2. Ultimate Goods
    • 3. An Attempted Classification of Ends
    • 4. Ideals of Conduct
    • 5. Vitally Important Topics
      • 1. Theory and Practice
      • 2. Practical Concerns and the Wisdom of Sentiment
      • 3. Vitally Important Truths
  • Indexes

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