Cover: Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, Volumes V and VI: Pragmatism and Pragmaticism and Scientific Metaphysics in HARDCOVER

Collected Papers of Charles Sanders Peirce, Volumes V and VI: Pragmatism and Pragmaticism and Scientific Metaphysics

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HARDCOVER

$312.00 • £249.95 • €281.00

ISBN 9780674138025

Publication Date: 01/01/1935

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  • Introduction
  • Editorial Note
  • Preface
    • 1. A Definition of Pragmatic and Pragmatism
    • 2. The Architectonic Construction of Pragmatism
    • 3. Historical Affinities and Genesis
  • Book I. Lectures on Pragmatism
    • Lecture I. Pragmatism. The Normative Sciences
      • 1. Two Statements of the Pragmatic Maxim
      • 2. The Meaning of Probability
      • 3. The Meaning of “Practical” Consequences
      • 4. The Relations of the Normative Sciences
    • Lecture II. The Universal Categories
      • 1. Presentness
      • 2. Struggle
      • 3. Laws. Nominalism
    • Lecture III. The Categories Continued
      • 1. Degenerate Thirdness
      • 2. The Seven Systems of Metaphysics
      • 3. The Irreducibility of the Categories
    • Lecture IV. The Reality of Thirdness
      • 1. Scholastic Realism
      • 2. Thirdness and Generality
      • 3. Normative Judgments
      • 4. Perceptual Judgments
    • Lecture V. Three Kinds of Goodness
      • 1. The Divisions of Philosophy
      • 2. Ethical and Esthetical Goodness
      • 3. Logical Goodness
    • Lecture VI. Three Types of Reasoning
      • 1. Perceptual Judgments and Generality
      • 2. The Plan and Steps of Reasoning
      • 3. Inductive Reasoning
      • 4. Instinct and Abduction
      • 5. The Meaning of an Argument
    • Lecture VII. Pragmatism and Abduction
      • 1. The Three Cotary Propositions
      • 2. Abduction and Perceptual judgments
      • 3. Pragmatism - the Logic of Abduction
      • 4. The Two Functions of Pragmatism
  • Book II. Published Papers
    • I. Questions Concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man
      • 1. Whether by the simple contemplation of a cognition, independently of any previous knowledge and without reasoning from signs, we are enabled rightly to judge whether that cognition has been determined by a previous cognition or whether it refers immediately to its object
      • 2. Whether we have an intuitive self-consciousness
      • 3. Whether we have an intuitive power of distinguishing between the subjective elements of different kinds of cognitions
      • 4. Whether we have any power of introspection, or whether our whole knowledge of the internal world is derived from the observation of external facts
      • 5. Whether we can think without signs
      • 6. Whether a sign can have any meaning, if by its definition it is the sign of something absolutely incognizable
      • 7. Whether there is any cognition not determined by a previous cognition
    • II. Some Consequences of Four Incapacities
      • 1. The Spirit of Cartesianism
      • 2. Mental Action
      • 3. Thought-Signs
      • 4. Man, a Sign
    • III. Grounds of Validity of the Laws of Logic. Further Consequences of Four Incapacities
      • 1. Objections to the Syllogism
      • 2. The Three Kinds of Sophisms
      • 3. The Social Theory of Logic
    • IV. The Fixation of Belief
      • 1. Science and Logic
      • 2. Guiding Principles
      • 3. Doubt and Belief
      • 4. The End of Inquiry
      • 5. Methods of Fixing Belief
    • V. How to Make Our Ideas Clear
      • 1. Clearness and Distinctness
      • 2. The Pragmatic Maxim
      • 3. Some Applications of the Pragmatic Maxim
      • 4. Reality
    • VI. What Pragmatism Is
      • 1. The Experimentalists’ View of Assertion
      • 2. Philosophical Nomenclature
      • 3. Pragmaticism
      • 4. Pragmaticism and Hegelian Absolute Idealism
    • VII. Issues of Pragmaticism
      • 1. Six Characters of Critical Common-Sensism
      • 2. Subjective and Objective Modality
  • Book III. Unpublished Papers
    • Chapter 1. A Survey of Pragmaticism
      • 1. The Kernel of Pragmatism
      • 2. The Valency of Concepts
      • 3. Logical Interpretants
      • 4. Other Views of Pragmatism
    • Chapter 2. Pragmaticism and Critical Common-Sensism
    • Chapter 3. Consequences of Critical Common-Sensism
      • 1. Individualism
      • 2. Critical Philosophy and the Philosophy of Common-Sense
      • 3. The Generality of the Possible
      • 4. Valuation
    • Chapter 4. Belief and Judgment
      • 1. Practical and Theoretical Beliefs
      • 2. Judgment and Assertion
    • Chapter 5. Truth
      • 1. Truth as Correspondence
      • 2. Truth and Satisfaction
      • 3. Definitions of Truth
    • Chapter 6. Methods for Attaining Truth
      • 1. The First Rule of Logic
      • 2. On Selecting Hypotheses
  • Appendix
    • 1. Knowledge
    • 2. Representationism
    • 3. Ultimate
    • 4. Mr. Peterson’s Proposed Discussion
  • Index of Proper Names
  • Index of Subjects

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