Cover: Community Mental Health and Social Psychiatry in PAPERBACK

Community Mental Health and Social Psychiatry

A Reference Guide

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$21.00 • £16.95 • €19.00

ISBN 9780674151000

Publication Date: 01/01/1962

Short

102 pages

World

Related Subjects

This single source provides a manageable, representative selection of rapidly accumulating literature. 1,158 items, primarily in U.S. literature from January 1953 to April 1961, complement the 984 items to May 1953 of Evaluation in Mental Health (USPHS Publications, 413).

The Guide’s arrangement imposes a useful structure upon the entire field; the detailed subject index offers easy access to all aspects of the materials. Part I lists 15 books for orientation in the field. Part II gives 715 items in five subject-categories: theory; practice; research methods and findings; evaluations and reviews of practice and research; and professional roles. Part III lists 317 items for related professions, and social problems. Part IV gives 61 bibliographical items to aid access to more extensive or specialized materials and 22 reference books on vital statistics and census data. Part V lists 28 reference works on information and funding organizations, with their addresses. The Guide’s comprehensive Author-Title-Subject Index is of special value. Introductory discussions, instructions on use, and a List of Journals are included.

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