Cover: Heretics, Saints and Martyrs, from Harvard University PressCover: Heretics, Saints and Martyrs in E-DITION

Heretics, Saints and Martyrs

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E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674183520

Publication Date: 01/01/1925

256 pages

World

Related Subjects

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In these seven essays on one or another aspect of theology, Frederic Palmer has pointed out the bond of unity that exists beneath all our ephemeral systems, the bond of a deep soul-breathing consciousness of close fellowship with God. What may be called the humanization of church history resets in the revelation in it of this unifying divine element. The papers discuss such topics as the Anabaptists and their relation to civil and religious liberty; Mani and dualism; the synoptic, Johannine, and Pauline conceptions of Jesus; Isaac Watts; Joachim of Floris; Angelus Silesius; and Perpetua and Felicitas, Martyrs and Saints.

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