Cover: The Ecology of Human Development: Experiments by Nature and Design, from Harvard University PressCover: The Ecology of Human Development in PAPERBACK

The Ecology of Human Development

Experiments by Nature and Design

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$40.00 • £32.95 • €36.00

ISBN 9780674224575

Publication Date: 09/15/1981

Short

352 pages

6-1/8 x 9-1/4 inches

World

The book’s purpose: to offer a new theoretical perspective for research in human development. Bronfenbrenner achieves this goal superbly… The synthesis offered in this book is unique… The effect is a perspective on the field of human development that is exciting in its possibilities… This is a usable and practical book…a powerful teaching text… It conveys masterfully the mystery and excitement of scientific investigation.Contemporary Psychology

[The Ecology of Human Development] should generate more productive research work and more sensible thinking about family policy than we have had in the past… Bronfenbrenner is headed in exactly the right direction for directing research and guiding public action. That is an impressive accomplishment.Psychology Today

Bronfenbrenner’s particular observations are thoughtful and provocative… [The book] provides a welcome antidote for the current spate of premature conclusions about what is and is not important in development.Science

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene