HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Lost Histories: Recovering the Lives of Japan’s Colonial Peoples, from Harvard University PressCover: Lost Histories in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 418

Lost Histories

Recovering the Lives of Japan’s Colonial Peoples

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$70.00 • £56.95 • €63.00

ISBN 9780674237278

Publication Date: 04/16/2019

Text

426 pages

6 x 9 inches

85 photos, 2 maps

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • List of Maps and Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Note to the Reader
  • List of Abbreviations
  • Introduction
  • I. Boundaries of Late Meiji Colonial Subjecthood
    • 1. Colonial Reality and Subaltern Subjectivity
    • 2. Meeting the Man on the Other Side
    • 3. The Paupers’ Grave at Margravine Cemetery
    • 4. Welcome to the Empire
  • II. Journeys between the Metropole and the Colonies
    • 5. The Taming of the Barbarian and Other Savage Love Stories
    • 6. Two Coconuts and a Bonito Stick
  • III. Performing and Living Racial-alities
    • 7. Dividing Space, Creating Barriers
    • 8. A Mountain of Bones
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Maps and Figures
    • Maps
      • 1. Japanese empire circa 1935
      • 2. Taiwan circa 1930
    • Figures
      • 1.1. The people in the Human Pavilion
      • 1.2. Entrance of the 1903 domestic exposition
      • 1.3. Montage of the people of the Human Pavilion
      • 2.1. Two-year-old Kiko
      • 2.2. John Batchelor and Pete Gorō
      • 2.3. Ainu group in St. Louis
      • 2.4. Kiko and Shutratek
      • 2.5. Photograph of a Patagonian man
      • 2.6. A page from Pete Gorō’s photo album
      • 2.7. Gorō’s creased copy of Beal’s photograph
      • 2.8. Gorō and one of the Krieckhaus sisters dressed in traditional Ainu clothing
      • 2.9. Gorō with Mathilda
      • 2.10. The Krieckhaus sisters
      • 2.11. Taken at the Krieckhaus home
      • 2.12. Members of the Proetz family
      • 2.13. Photograph of Shutratek taken by Vasilyev
      • 2.14. Beaded bracelet bought in St. Louis
      • 2.15. Kaizawa Seiko’s bowl
      • 2.16. Montage of Ainu, Japanese, and Taiwanese Aborigines
      • 2.17. Munro’s photographs of Ainu informants
      • 3.1. Site of unmarked paupers’ grave in London where Ruji Suruchan was buried
      • 3.2. Paiwan representative at press conference about lawsuit against NHK
      • 3.3. “Baruharu-Chaco”
      • 3.4. “Tugie Kalowan, Chief”
      • 3.5. Postcard captioned “Taiwan Savages”
      • 3.6. Montage of Paiwan signatures
      • 3.7. Five “Sinicized” members of the Paiwan group
      • 3.8. William Price with Paiwan from Kuskus
      • 3.9. William Price with Japanese police officers and the Tsou
      • 3.10. “Chief of Subon village”
      • 3.11. “Paiwan woman in full dress”
      • 4.1. “The natives of each new territory”
      • 4.2. 1912 exposition flyer
      • 4.3. Dolls representing the world’s races
      • 4.4. Uesanashi, Kishino, and Kopuanu
      • 4.5. Tsubosawa Rokusuke, Tsubosawa Teru, Kimura Chikamaha, and Kageyama Chukaranke
      • 4.6. Teruko’s signature
      • 4.7. Roku and another man, front view; photo by Bronisław Piłsudski
      • 4.8. Roku and another man, side profile; photo by Bronisław Piłsudski
      • 4.9. “New Japan” 1912 Tokyo Colonial Exposition pamphlet
      • 4.10. Plate carved by Uesanashi
      • 4.11. Plate carved by Utorentoku
      • 4.12. Haijō Haibatsutei, Shirakawa Shiemon, Shirakawa Kuruparumaha, and Nishihira Ume
      • 5.1. Yayutz Bleyh’s gravestone in Fuxing, Taiwan
      • 5.2. Photo of Nakano Chūzō in Chen Wanfu’s photo album
      • 5.3. Yayutz on stage in 1912
      • 5.4. Yayutz pictured in Tokyo
      • 5.5. Yayutz walking in Tokyo surrounded by onlookers
      • 5.6. Tour group with Yayutz holding an umbrella
      • 5.7. Yayutz in a Ginza café
      • 5.8. Yayutz pictured at Neihengping Aboriginal Language Institute
      • 5.9. Formal portrait of Yayutz
      • 5.10. Yayutz with Japanese policemen in Taiwan
      • 5.11. Yayutz’s funeral
      • 5.12. Aliman is center, in the back row
      • 5.13. Aliman pictured in middle row, third from left
      • 5.14. Poster sent to 1900 Paris Exposition
      • 5.15. Aliman with Kodama, with sake bottles in the background
      • 5.16. Dahu at the Pingtung airport
      • 5.17. Dahu with son Shida
      • 5.18. Dahu presenting antlers of a sambar
      • 5.19. Photograph of Dahu taken by Segawa Kōkichi
      • 5.20. Dahu and his family’s party with Segawa
      • 5.21. Dahu with several high-level police officers
      • 6.1. Pedro Ada with friends in Tokyo
      • 6.2. Ngiraked with Japanese friends
      • 6.3. Ngiraked and Kitamura Nobuaki
      • 6.4. Josef and Ngiraked
      • 6.5. “Chief’s son is searching for a Japanese wife”
      • 6.6. Futōko and her mother
      • 6.7. Augusta
      • 7.1. Kaizawa Tōzō and his wife, Koyo
      • 7.2. Koyo, Neill James, and Tōzō
      • 7.3. Neill James dressed as an Ainu
      • 7.4. Tōzō visiting Noboribetsu hot springs
      • 7.5. Prewar postcard of Ekashimatoku and his wife, Saki
      • 7.6. Ekashimatoku with Uehara Masami’s grandfather
      • 7.7. Returned Ainu soldiers skin a bear
      • 7.8. School trip to Shiraoi in 1953
      • 7.9. Sign reads: “Chief Miyamoto Tomoramu”
      • 7.10. Moritake Takeichi
      • 7.11. Miyamoto Tomoramu
      • 8.1. A cave in Maehira, Okinawa, where bones of the war dead were collected
      • 8.2. “Nanboku no tō” memorial
      • 8.3. Yamamoto Tasuke

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