HARVARD UNIVERSITY PHYSICS DEPARTMENT
Cover: Particles in Our Air in PAPERBACK

Particles in Our Air

Exposures and Health Effects

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$21.00 • £16.95 • €19.00

ISBN 9780674240773

Publication Date: 04/15/1996

Short

265 pages

6 x 9 inches

Various tables, graphs ,and line illustrations

Harvard University Physics Department

World

It is no secret that the burning of fossil fuels causes air pollution and adversely affects the health of the human population. Over the last 10 years, research has been providing new insight about the health consequences of particulate air pollution. Generated by the use of fossil energy, respirable-sized particles pose a major threat to our environment and health. In this book the hypothesis that fossil fuels are the primary culprit is examined in detail, including the nature, generation, and transport of particulate air pollution. The authors cite studies on animals and epidemiological studies—those showing acute effects soon after exposure and those exhibiting chronic effects decades later—and include models describing mechanisms by which the effects of fine particulates can be induced. Through its probing inquiry, this book makes clear that present levels of air pollution, even in countries with aggressive environmental controls, are a health hazard that must be contended with.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene