HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Imaginative Mapping: Landscape and Japanese Identity in the Tokugawa and Meiji Eras, from Harvard University PressCover: Imaginative Mapping in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 422

Imaginative Mapping

Landscape and Japanese Identity in the Tokugawa and Meiji Eras

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$60.00 • £48.95 • €54.00

ISBN 9780674241121

Publication Date: 08/13/2019

Text

322 pages

6 x 9 inches

15 photos, 20 color illus., 3 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

  • List of Tables and Figures*
  • Acknowledgments
  • Note to the Reader
  • Introduction
  • 1. Local Topography in Seventeenth-Century Japan
  • 2. The “Country of the Deities”
  • 3. Mapping the Capital
  • 4. Transformation of the Spirits
  • 5. Philosophizing the Divine Country
  • 6. Geography of the Divine Nation
  • Conclusion: Landscape and National History
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • * Tables and Figures
    • Tables
      • 3.1. Places mentioned during the 17-day tour of the capital, days 1–5
      • 3.2. Places mentioned during the 17-day tour of the capital, days 6–11
      • 3.3. Places mentioned during the 17-day tour of the capital, days 12–17
    • Figures
      • I.1. “New Edition: A Map of All Provinces of Japan” (Shinhan Nihonkoku ōezu)
      • 1.1. The Book of Villages (gōchoō), showing Kadono County, Yamashiro province
      • 1.2. The Book of Villages (gōchoō), showing Soekami County, Yamato province
      • 1.3. Provincial map of Yamashiro during the Genroku era
      • 1.4. Close-up of figure 1.3
      • 2.1. Map of Chikuzen province (1779)
      • 2.2. “Preface” (Jijo) to Chikuzen no kuni zoku fudoki
      • 2.3. “Preface” (Jo) to Chikuzen no kuni zoku fudoki
      • 2.4. “General Remarks” (Sōron) in Chikuzen no kuni zoku fudoki, vol. 1
      • 3.1. Direction chart
      • 3.2. Topography of the capital of Japan
      • 3.3. Day 1 of the tour
      • 3.4. Day 2
      • 3.5. Day 3
      • 3.6. Day 4
      • 3.7. Day 5
      • 3.8. Day 6
      • 3.9. Day 7
      • 3.10. Days 8 and 9
      • 3.11. Days 10 and 12
      • 3.12. Days 11 and 14
      • 3.13. Day 13
      • 3.14. Day 15
      • 3.15. Day 16
      • 3.16. Day 17
      • 4.1. Atsutane’s illustration of the first stage of creation
      • 4.2. The second stage
      • 4.3. The third stage
      • 4.4. The fourth stage
      • 4.5. The eighth stage
      • 4.6. The tenth stage
      • 6.1. Map of Japan, “Nipponkoku” by Shiga Shigetaka
      • 6.2. Diagram of mountains with their best-known waka poems
      • 6.3. Volcanoes in the Kuril Islands
      • 6.4. Volcanoes in Japan

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