Cover: Third Thoughts: The Universe We Still Don’t Know, from Harvard University PressCover: Third Thoughts in PAPERBACK

Third Thoughts

The Universe We Still Don’t Know

  • Preface
  • I. Science History
    • 1. The Uses of Astronomy
    • 2. The Art of Discovery
    • 3. From Rutherford to the LHC
    • 4. Educators and Academics, Underground in Texas
    • 5. The Rise of the Standard Models
    • 6. Long Times and Short Times
    • 7. Keeping an Eye on the Present—Whig History of Science
    • 8. The Whig History of Science: An Exchange
  • II. Physics and Cosmology
    • 9. What Is an Elementary Particle?
    • 10. The Universe We Still Don’t Know
    • 11. Varieties of Symmetry
    • 12. The Higgs, and Beyond
    • 13. Why the Higgs?
    • 14. The Trouble with Quantum Mechanics
  • III. Public Matters
    • 15. Obama Gets Space Funding Right
    • 16. The Crisis of Big Science
    • 17. Liberal Disappointment
    • 18. Keep Loopholes Open
    • 19. Against Manned Space Flight
    • 20. Skeptics and Scientists
  • IV. Personal Matters
    • 21. Change Course
    • 22. Writing about Science
    • 23. On Being Wrong
    • 24. The Craft of Science, and the Craft of Art
    • 25. New York to Austin, and Return
  • Sources
  • Index

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Awards & Accolades

  • Steven Weinberg Is Winner of the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physics
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Jacket: Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, by James L. Nolan, Jr., from Harvard University Press

Remembering Hiroshima

On this day 75 years ago, the United States dropped the world’s first atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. James L. Nolan Jr.’s grandfather was a doctor who participated in the Manhattan Project, and he writes about him in Atomic Doctors: Conscience and Complicity at the Dawn of the Nuclear Age, an unflinching examination of the moral and professional dilemmas faced by physicians who took part in the project. Below, please find the introduction to Nolan’s book. On the morning of June 17, 1945, Captain James F. Nolan, MD, boarded a plane