Cover: Unbelievers: An Emotional History of Doubt, from Harvard University PressCover: Unbelievers in HARDCOVER

Unbelievers

An Emotional History of Doubt

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$27.95 • £22.95 • €27.00

ISBN 9780674241824

Publication Date: 11/19/2019

Trade

272 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

Belknap Press

Not for sale in UK, British Commonwealth (except Canada), Europe and Israel

“How has unbelief come to dominate so many Western societies? The usual account invokes the advance of science and rational knowledge. Ryrie’s alternative, in which emotions are the driving force, offers new and interesting insights into our past and present.”—Charles Taylor, author of A Secular Age

The award-winning author of Protestants offers a new vision of the birth of the secular age, looking to the feelings of ordinary men and women—so often left out of the history of atheism.

Why have societies that were once overwhelmingly Christian become so secular? We think we know the answer, but in this lively and startlingly original reconsideration, Alec Ryrie argues that people embraced unbelief much as they have always chosen their worldviews: through their hearts more than their minds.

Looking back to the crisis of the Reformation and beyond, Unbelievers shows how, long before philosophers started to make the case for atheism, powerful cultural currents were challenging traditional faith. These tugged in different ways not only on celebrated thinkers such as Machiavelli, Montaigne, Hobbes, and Pascal, but on men and women at every level of society whose voices we hear through their diaries, letters, and court records.

Ryrie traces the roots of atheism born of anger, a sentiment familiar to anyone who has ever cursed a corrupt priest, and of doubt born of anxiety, as Christians discovered their faith was flimsier than they had believed. As the Reformation eroded time-honored certainties, Protestant radicals defended their faith by redefining it in terms of ethics. In the process they set in motion secularizing forces that soon became transformational. Unbelievers tells a powerful emotional history of doubt with potent lessons for our own angry and anxious age.

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