MURTY CLASSICAL LIBRARY OF INDIA
Cover: The History of Akbar, Volume 8, from Harvard University PressCover: The History of Akbar, Volume 8 in HARDCOVER

Murty Classical Library of India 30

The History of Akbar, Volume 8

Abu'l-Fazl

Edited and translated by Wheeler M. Thackston

Add to Cart

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674244177

Publication Date: 01/04/2022

Text

Akbarnāma, or The History of Akbar, by Abu’l-Fazl (d. 1602), is one of the most important works of Indo-Persian history and a touchstone of prose artistry. Marking a high point in a long, rich tradition of Persian historical writing, it served as a model for historians across the Persianate world. The work is at once a biography of the Mughal emperor Akbar (r. 1556–1605) that includes descriptions of political and martial feats and cultural achievements, and a chronicle of sixteenth-century India.

The eighth and final volume spans the thirty-ninth to fiftieth years of Akbar’s reign, detailing the conquest of Ahmadnagar, prince Salim’s rebellion, and the emperor’s final days. The Persian text, presented in the Naskh script, is based on a careful reassessment of the primary sources.

MCLI volumes are available in India in both hardcover and paperback from amazon.in as well as from leading bookstores and airport shops throughout the subcontinent.

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene