MURTY CLASSICAL LIBRARY OF INDIA
Cover: Theft of a Tree, from Harvard University PressCover: Theft of a Tree in HARDCOVER

Murty Classical Library of India 32

Theft of a Tree

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$35.00 • £28.95 • €31.50

ISBN 9780674245891

Publication Date: 01/05/2022

Text

544 pages

5-1/4 x 8 inches

1 illus

Murty Classical Library of India

World

Legend has it that the sixteenth-century Telugu poet Nandi Timmana composed Theft of a Tree, or Pārijātāpaharaṇamu, which he based on a popular millennium-old tale, to help the wife of Krishnadevaraya, king of the south Indian Vijayanagara Empire, win back her husband’s affections.

Theft of a Tree recounts how Krishna stole the pārijāta, a wish-granting tree, from the garden of Indra, king of the gods. Krishna does so to please his favorite wife, Satyabhama, who is upset when he gifts his chief queen a single divine flower. After battling Indra, Krishna plants the tree for Satyabhama—but she must perform a rite temporarily relinquishing it and her husband to enjoy endless happiness. The poem’s narrative unity, which was unprecedented in the literary tradition, prefigures the modern Telugu novel.

Theft of a Tree is presented here in the Telugu script alongside the first English translation.

MCLI volumes are available in India in both hardcover and paperback from amazon.in as well as from leading bookstores and airport shops throughout the subcontinent.

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