HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: One Belt One Road: Chinese Power Meets the World, from Harvard University PressCover: One Belt One Road in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 439

One Belt One Road

Chinese Power Meets the World

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Product Details

HARDCOVER

$60.00 • £48.95 • €54.00

ISBN 9780674247956

Publication Date: 11/17/2020

Text

330 pages

6 x 9 inches

18 color photos, 1 illus., 12 color maps, 2 tables

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

From Tanzania to Malaysia, Russia to Iran, Eyck Freymann takes readers inside China’s One Belt One Road, the largest global infrastructure development program in history.

In this authoritative and accessible book, Freymann argues that OBOR is not the centralized and systematic investment policy that many commentators have made it out to be. Rather, it is a largely aspirational and sometimes ad hoc campaign to export an ancient Chinese model of patronage and tribute. Inside China, propaganda depicts President Xi Jinping restoring the nation’s lost imperial glory. Overseas, China uses massive investments to cultivate relationships with willing politicians and political parties. Freymann finds that this strategy is working. Even in countries where OBOR megaprojects fail, political leaders are still excited about the potential benefits of continued partnership with China.

One Belt One Road is a guide for understanding China’s burgeoning commercial empire. Drawing on primary documents in five languages, interviews with many senior officials, and on-the-ground case studies from the salt flats of Sri Lanka to the shipyards of Greece, Freymann tells the monumental story of the world’s latest encounter with Chinese power.

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