Cover: Equalities in PAPERBACK

Equalities

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$32.00 • £25.95 • €29.00

ISBN 9780674259812

Publication Date: 07/15/1983

Short

240 pages

6 x 9 inches

23 line illustrations, 31 tables

World

Related Subjects

It will be impossible from now on to discuss equality intelligently, or to claim expertise in the subject, without having read this book.American Political Science Review

A brilliant work of analytical scholarship dealing with the classical concept of equality which ‘intends neither criticism of the ideal nor unilateral endorsement of it.’Choice

This is an excellent example of the kind of rigor and precision that is necessary if we are to deal adequately with fundamental political values. The principle of equality is hardly self-explanatory. There are, logically, many different kinds of relative inequality, and each has different implications as a measure of social justice and public policy.—Charles Anderson, University of Wisconsin

Equalities is an outstanding book. It represents an intellectual achievement of extraordinary merit. I found the manuscript fascinating reading. And the book illuminates a tremendously important problem in public policy today—the problem of distributing public goods in such a way that individual and group entitlements are properly regarded.—Samuel C. Patterson, University of Iowa

Douglas Rae’s Equalities is a clear-headed and clearly presented exploration of some of the most difficult issues of democratic government. More than most such explorations, it will be of great interest and assistance to unspecialized citizens as well as to political scientists and philosophers.—Austin Ranney, American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research

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