Cover: Capitalism, Alone: The Future of the System That Rules the World, from Harvard University PressCover: Capitalism, Alone in PAPERBACK

Capitalism, Alone

The Future of the System That Rules the World

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$19.95 • £15.95 • €18.00

ISBN 9780674260306

Publication Date: 09/07/2021

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304 pages

5-1/2 x 8-1/4 inches

26 illus., 3 tables

Belknap Press

World

Listen to Branko Milanovic discuss with WBUR (Boston, MA)’s On Point how to break the cycles of greed and inequality (and read an excerpt from Capitalism, Alone):

“A brilliant sequel to the pathbreaking Global Inequality… Poses all the important questions about our future.”—Gordon Brown

“Erudite, illuminating… Narrative in style and engaging to read… Milanovic chronicles the rise of authoritarian capitalism, both in nations that once epitomized liberal capitalism such as the U.S. and in countries like China, which are partly capitalist but show no signs of turning liberal… As a virtuoso economist, Milanovic is superb when he is compiling and assessing data.”—Robert Kuttner, The New York Review of Books

“Leaves little doubt that the social contract no longer holds. Whether you live in Beijing or New York, the time for renegotiation is approaching.”—Edward Luce, Financial Times

“A scholar of inequality warns that while capitalism may have seen off rival economic systems, the survival of liberal democracies is anything but assured.”—The Economist

We are all capitalists now. For the first time in human history, the globe is dominated by one economic system. In Capitalism, Alone, leading economist Branko Milanovic explains the reasons for this decisive historical shift since the days of feudalism and, later, communism. Surveying the varieties of capitalism, he asks: What are the prospects for a fairer world now that capitalism is the only game in town? His conclusions are sobering, but not fatalistic. Capitalism gets much wrong, but also much right—and it is not going anywhere. Our task is to improve it.

Milanovic argues that capitalism has triumphed because it works. It delivers prosperity and gratifies human desires for autonomy. But it comes with a moral price, pushing us to treat material success as the ultimate goal. And it offers no guarantee of stability. In the West, liberal capitalism creaks under the strains of inequality and capitalist excess. That model now fights for hearts and minds with political capitalism, exemplified by China, which many claim is more efficient, but which is more vulnerable to corruption and, when growth is slow, social unrest. As for the economic problems of the Global South, Milanovic offers a creative, if controversial, plan for large-scale migration. Looking to the future, he dismisses prophets who proclaim some single outcome to be inevitable, whether worldwide prosperity or robot-driven mass unemployment. Capitalism is a risky system. But it is a human system. Our choices, and how clearly we see them, will determine how it serves us.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

Honoring Latour

In awarding Bruno Latour the 2021 Kyoto Prize for Arts and Philosophy, the Inamori Foundation said he has “revolutionized the conventional view of science” and “his philosophy re-examines ‘modernity’ based on the dualism of nature and society.” Below is an excerpt from An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns. For more than twenty years, scientific and technological controversies have proliferated in number and scope, eventually reaching the climate itself. Since geologists are beginning to use the term “Anthropocene” to designate the era of Earth’s history that follows the Holocene