ILEX SERIES
Cover: Worlds of Knowledge in Women’s Travel Writing, from Harvard University PressCover: Worlds of Knowledge in Women’s Travel Writing in PAPERBACK

Ilex Series 25

Worlds of Knowledge in Women’s Travel Writing

Edited by James Uden

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Product Details

PAPERBACK

$19.95 • £15.95 • €18.00

ISBN 9780674260566

Publication Date: 01/11/2022

Text

250 pages

6 x 9 inches

4 photos

Ilex Foundation > Ilex Series

World

Worlds of Knowledge in Women’s Travel Writing rediscovers the works of a wide range of authors from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. A stowaway on a voyage circumnavigating the globe; a nineteenth-century visitor to schools in Japan; an Indian activist undertaking a pilgrimage to Iraq—these are some of the women whose experiences come to life in this volume. Worlds of Knowledge explores travel writing as a genre for communicating information about other cultures and for testing assumptions about the nature and extent of women’s expertise. The book challenges the frequent focus in travel studies on English-language texts by exploring works in French and Urdu as well as English and focusing on journeys to France, Spain, Turkey, Iran, Iraq, India, Ethiopia, Japan, Australia, and the Falkland Islands. Written by experts in a wide range of fields, this interdisciplinary volume sheds new light on the range, innovation, and erudition of travel narratives by women.

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Jacket: An Inquiry into Modes of Existence: An Anthropology of the Moderns, by Bruno Latour, translated by Catherine Porter, from Harvard University Press

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