HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Cine-Mobility: Twentieth-Century Transformations in Korea’s Film and Transportation, from Harvard University PressCover: Cine-Mobility in HARDCOVER

Harvard East Asian Monographs 449

Cine-Mobility

Twentieth-Century Transformations in Korea’s Film and Transportation

Not yet available

Product Details

HARDCOVER

$49.95 • £39.95 • €45.00

ISBN 9780674267978

Publication Date: 05/17/2022

Text

280 pages

6 x 9 inches

71 photos, 1 color photo, 1 table

Harvard University Asia Center > Harvard East Asian Monographs

World

In 1916, a group of Korean farmers and their children gathered to watch a film depicting the enthronement of the Japanese emperor. For this screening, a unit of the colonial government’s news agency brought a projector and generator by train to their remote rural town. Before the formation of commercial moviegoing culture for colonial audiences in rural Korean towns, many films were sent to such towns and villages as propaganda. The colonial authorities, as well as later South Korean postcolonial state authorities, saw film as the most effective medium for disseminating their political messages. In Cine-Mobility, Han Sang Kim argues that the force of propaganda films in Korea was derived primarily not from their messages but from the new mobility of the viewing position.

From the first film shot in Korea in 1901 through early internet screen cultures in late 1990s South Korea, Cine-Mobility explores the association between cinematic media and transportation mobility, not only in diverse and discrete forms such as railroads, motorways, automobiles, automation, and digital technologies, but also in connection with the newly established rules and restrictions and the new culture of mobility, including changes in gender dynamics, that accompanied it.

Recent News

Black lives matter. Black voices matter. A statement from HUP »

From Our Blog

Cover: A Theory of Justice: Original Edition, by John Rawls, from Harvard University Press

John Rawls: Speaking in a Shared Political Language

On the occasion of the anniversary of the publication of A Theory of Justice, Andrius Gališanka, author of John Rawls: The Path to a Theory of Justice, reflects on some of Rawls’s ideas on moral and political reasoning