Cover: Primitivism in Modern Art, from Harvard University PressCover: Primitivism in Modern Art in E-DITION

Primitivism in Modern Art

Available from De Gruyter »

Product Details

E-DITION

$65.00 • £54.95 • €60.00

ISBN 9780674281882

Publication Date: 12/23/1986

339 pages

68 halftones

Belknap Press

Paperbacks in Art History

World

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This now classic study maps the profound effect of primitive art on modern, as well as the primitivizing strain in modern art itself. Robert Goldwater describes how and why works by primitive artists attracted modern painters and sculptors, and he delineates the differences between what is truly primitive or archaic and what intentionally embodies such elements. His analysis distinguishes the romanticism of Gauguin; an emotional primitivism exemplified by the Brücke and Blaue Reiter groups in Germany; the intellectual primitivism of Picasso and Modigliani; and a “primitivism of the subconscious” in Miró, Klee, and Dali. Two of Goldwater’s related essays—“Judgments of Primitive Art, 1905–1965” and “Art History and Anthropology”—have been added for this edition.

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Jacket: How To Be Gay, by David M. Halperin, from Harvard University Press

Celebrating Pride Month, Part II

To celebrate Pride Month, we are highlighting excerpts from books that explore the lives and experiences of the LGBT+ community. This second excerpt comes from How To Be Gay, a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, in which David M. Halperin, a pioneer of LGBTQ studies, dares to suggest that gayness is a way of being that gay men must learn from one another to become who they are.