HARVARD EAST ASIAN MONOGRAPHS
Cover: Five Mountains: The Rinzai Zen Monastic Institution in Medieval Japan, from Harvard University PressCover: Five Mountains in PAPERBACK

Harvard East Asian Monographs 85

Five Mountains

The Rinzai Zen Monastic Institution in Medieval Japan

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$20.95 • £16.95 • €19.00

ISBN 9780674304987

Publication Date: 01/06/1996

Short

  • List of Illustrations*
  • Foreword by Edwin O. Reischauer
  • Preface
  • Introduction
  • I. The Development of the Institution
    • 1. Japanese Zen Pioneers and their Patrons
      • Stages of Acculturation
      • Motives of Japanese Zen Pioneers
      • Eisai and the Kamakura Shogunate
      • Enni and Kujō Michiie
      • Shinchi and the Ideal of the Recluse
      • Dōgen and His Patrons
    • 2. Chinese Émigré Monks and Japanese Warrior-Rulers
      • Hōjō Patronage
      • Hōjō Tokiyori and Lan-ch’i Tao-lung
      • Hōjō Tokiyori and Wu-an P’u-ning
      • Hōjō Tokimune’s Patronage of Zen
      • Hōjō Tokimune and Wu-hsueh Tsu-yuan
      • Hōjō Sadatoki and I-shan I-ning
      • Hōjō Takatoki’s Patronage of Zen
      • The Zen Contribution to Warrior Culture
      • Provincial Diffusion of Zen
      • Imperial Patronage of Zen
    • 3. The Articulation of the Gozan System
      • Go-Daigo and Musō
      • Reorganization of the Gozan
      • Go-Daigo’s Motives
      • Ashikaga Patronage of Zen
      • Takauji and Tadayoshi
      • The Building of Tenryūji and Ashikaga Power
      • Ankokuji and Rishōtō
      • Gozan, Jissatsu, and Shozan
      • Regional Distribution
      • Centralization and Control of the Gozan by the Ashikaga
      • The Tenka Sōroku and the Inryōshoku
      • Zenith and Decline
      • The Emergence of Daitokuji and Myōshinji
  • II. The Structure of the Institution
    • 4. The Zen Monastic Life and Rule
      • The Development of the Rule
      • The Problem of the Pai-chang Code
      • The Ch’an-men Regulations and the Ch’an-yuan Code
      • Introduction of the Ch’an Monastic Rule to Japan
      • The Rinsenji Code
      • Bakufu Regulation of the Gozan
    • 5. The Monastery and Its Sub-Temples
      • Transmission of the Ground Plan
      • The Setting
      • The Layout
      • Gates
      • The Buddha Hall
      • The Dharma Hall
      • The Abbot’s Building
      • The Bathhouse, Latrines, and Washstands
      • The Monks’ Hall
      • The Reading Room
      • The Kitchen-Office
    • 6. The Community
      • Population
      • The Abbot
      • The Officers
      • Acolytes
      • Postulants and Novices
    • 7. The Zen Monastic Economy
      • Ch’an Communities in China
      • Japan: Zen Monastic Domains
      • The Engakuji Economy
      • The Nanzenji Economy
      • The Daitokuji Economy
      • Management of the Zen Monastic Domain
  • Conclusion
  • Notes
  • Bibliography
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • * Illustrations
    • 1. East Asia in the Year 1200
    • 2. The Provinces of Medieval Japan
    • 3. The Monastery of T’ien-t’ung-shan
    • 4. Ch’an Master Wu-chun Shih-fan
    • 5. The Monastery of Tōfukuji
    • 6. Gozan Woodblock Printed Book
    • 7. Hōjō Tokiyori in the Robes of a Zen Abbot
    • 8. Document Signed by Hōjō Takatori
    • 9. Ground Plan of T’ien-t’ung-shan
    • 10. Ground Plan of Kenchōji
    • 11. The Buddha Hall at Chin-shan
    • 12. The Bathhouse at T’ien-t’ung-shan
    • 13. The Latrine at Chin-shan
    • 14. The Monks’ Hall at Ching-shan
    • 15. The Reading Room at Chin-shan

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